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XT RARELY falls to the lot of a man to practically finish his great life task 
and then live on to enjoy the fruit of it, to witness its continuous expansion 
and to hear grateful and generous expressions of appreciation from those 
who have been the beneficiaries of his great work. 

Such is the great privilege of Dr. C. C. Cody. When he came to Southwestern 
University, nearly forty years ago, he at once displayed those qualities and qualifications, 
which, persisted in, have made him the most conspicuous and best loved man in the 
College life of Texas. 

Coming to Texas at that time, he had innumerable and tempting opportunities 
to engage in lucrative business, and, such was his native financial skill, that he could 
easily have amassed a fortune. But the dominating passion of his life was not to make 
money but to make men. 

Nature made him a gentleman, the grace of God made him a christian, education 
and wide reading gave him culture, and Southwestern University gave him a congenial 
and fruitful field in which to pursue his high ambitions. 

He endorsed, heartily, the ideas and ideals originally set up for Southwestern 
by her noble founder, and so persistently set himself to the task of having these ideals 
exhibited in the life of each student, that he himself became their complete embodiment ; 
so that when anyone saw Dr. Cody, in the class room, crossing the campus, walking 
the street, speaking from the platform, or dispensing gracious hospitality in his home, 
he saw Southwestern University incarnate. 

In pursuance of his ideals, — the making of men — he never wavered and never 
seemed to weary. The six hours a day spent in the class room were but a small part 
of his labor. Of the ten thousand students who passed through Southwestern during 
bis active connection with it he knew every one by name, and so won and held their 
confidence and esteem that none ever hesitated to come to him for help in any diffi- 
cult or perplexing situation. And no one ever found him too busy or too tired to 
give an interested and sympathetic hearing. He was constantly striving to find an 
easy passage to some boy's heart that he might influence him for good. Of this intense 
intelligent and unselfish service there are today living monuments all over Texas. 
From Galveston to Dalhart, from Texarkana to El Paso are honorable men and charming 
women who were boys or girls at old Southwestern and all of them have words of 
love and appreciation for this some time teacher and all time friend, Dr. Cody. 

JOHN M. BARCUS. 




For the warm cooperation accorded us by the 
Student Body, the '16 Sou 'Wester Staff wishes to 
express its thanks. 

We have tried to give you a book worthy of 
Southwestern and a book that would truly reflect 
the happenings of the good year 1915 and 1916 at 
our Alma Mater. The measure of our success in 
this task is for you to judge. 





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BOOK I THE UNIVERSITY 

BOOK II ORGANIZATIONS 

BOOK III CLASSES 

BOOK IV ATHLETICS 

BOOK V CORNER OF OUR LIBRARY 

BOOK VI PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

BOOK VII ADVERTISEMENTS 



Board of Trustees 



Officers 



Rev. W. D. Bradfield, D. D President. 

B. D. Orgain Vice President. 



E. G. Gillett Treasurer.. 

Rev. R. G. Mood Secretary. 



Members 

TEXAS CONFERENCE. 



Rev. R. W. Adams, Huntsville ...1916 

Rev. I. P. Betts. Jacksonville 1918 

C. W. Boone. Tyler 1918 

Judge W. L. Dean, Huntsville..... 1917 

Rev. L. B. Elrod. Timpson 1918 



Dr. J. H. Foster, Houston 1917 

Dr. James Kilgore, D. D., Houston. ...1918 

E. C. Lamb, Houston 1916 

Rev. J. W. Mills, Houston 191C 

Dr. I. P. Sessions, Rockdale... 1915 



NORTH TEXAS CONFERENCE. 



Rev. D. H. Aston, Greenville 1919 

L. Blaylock, Dallas 1916 

Rev. W. F. Bryan, Paris 1916 

Read Markham, Sherman 1918 

Rev. R. G. Mood, Sherman 1918 



J. E. Morris, Greenville ....1910 

Rev. J. F. Pierce, Gainesville 1917 

Rev. J. E. Roach, Georgetown 1915 

J. J. Russell, Piano 1917 

Sylvester Stark, Jacksboro 1915 



CENTRAL TEXAS CONFERENCE. 



Rev. W. B. Andrews, Waxahachie....l917 
Rev. J. M. Barcus, D. D., Hillsboro....l916 

A. F. Bentley, Temple... 191.7 

F. F. Downs, Temple 1915 

Rev. Emmett Hightower, Georgetown 1918 



M. B. Lockett, Georgetown 1917 

Judge T. L McCullough, Waco ..1915 

Rev. W. L. Nelms, D. D., Weatherford 1917 

H. S. Wilson, Cleburne 1917 

Rev. C. R. Wright, D. D., Fort Worth 1915 



WEST TEXAS CONFERENCE. 



Rev. W. D. Bradfield, D. D., Dallas.. ..1918 

Dr. Jno. W. Burns, Cuero 1918 

Judge C. A. Wilcox, Austin 1917 

Rev. Thomas Gregory, San Marcos... .19 15 
W. N. Hagy, San Antonio 1915 



Rev. J. T. King, Waelder. 1916 

B. D. Orgain, Esq., Bastrop 1916 

Prof. J. E. Pritchett, San Marcos 1917 

Rev. T. F. Sessions, Beeville... ..1917 

Rev. A. J. Weeks, Clarendon 1917 






GERMAN MISSION CONFERENCE. 
Rev. F. W. Radetzky, Houston 1918 Dr. Fritz Karbach, Maxwell. 



.1918 



NORTHWEST TEXAS CONFERENCE. 



Judge D. E. Decker, Quanah 1916 

Rev. G. S. Hardy, Sweetwater 1916 

Abe Holt, Abilene 1917 

Rev. J. B. Miller, Stamford 1916 

Rev. A. L. Moore, Big Springs 1918 



N. G. Rollins, Aspermont 1918 

S. W. Scott, Esq., San Antonio 1916 

Rev. Simeon Shaw, Quanah 1918 

Hon. F. P. Works, Amarillo 1916 

Rev. G. S. Wyatt, Stamford 1918 






EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



C. M. Bishop, Chairman Georgetown 

C. C. Cody, Secretary Georgetown 

A. F. Bentley Temple 

A. A. Booty Georgetown 

E. G. Gillett Georgetown 



Rev. II. G. Mood Sherman 

A. S. Pegues Georgetown 

Rev. James Kilgore, D. D Houston 

B. D. Orgain Bastrop 

Rev. A. L. Moore Big Springs 



10 







Dr. Charles McTyeire Bishop 

President of Southwestern University 

Nothing need be said in this place 
concerning the facts of Dr. Bishop's life. 
Those who are interested in these things 
may go to WHO'S WHO IN AMERICA; 
to his published books and magazine ar- 
ticles ;to his numerous friends and acquain- 
tances and inquire what he believes and 
what he has done. Here we are concerned 
with a somewhat more intimate picture ; a 
picture of our friend, counsellor and 
leader. 

As our counsellor, Dr. Bishop holds 
out a strong Christian manhood. Day and 
night, in college hall and on campus, on 
platform or in private conversation, we 
find our President pleading for the best and 
most vital scholarship, friendship, work, 
play, 'ability and action. As we teach, as 
we buy and sell, as we sit in churches or 
walk thru slums, as we study or play; 

everywhere and under all circumstances as we meet our fellows and do out- 
work, we do well to follow this plain, vital Christian life and ideal which our 
counsellor holds out to us by precept and example. 

We students and young people, whose interests and ideals are yet in 
the making, whose struggles are as yet shielded from the uncompromising gi\ e 
and take of the market place; will an older man, a busy man with large 
responsibilities, temptations and fights be our friend? Our President is such 
a man. With stacks of letters on his desk; with many meetings to attend, 
with much work to do and supervise, with the eyes of thousands upon thous- 
ands upon him as the chief executive of a great college, with only twenty-four 
hours to spend each day, this man — and only a man, forsooth — frequently 
comes to us in our work and play, in our troubles and in our joys, in our lives 
as students and citizens to advise us and to help us. We do well to remember 
that we have such a, friend. 

We are spending or have spent much time, money, and energy in South- 
western. For better or worse we have helped to make her what she is today 
and much of our life and character has been moulded by her. After all, the 
years we spend within her halls are important years and what we learn to 
do and do do there will in large measure gauge our future life. Do we follow a 
worthy leader? for some six years our President has stood before us and with 
able executive ability, keen foresight, sincere and earnest hard work, and an 
unbending trust in the ultimate triumph of our cause has sought to lead us all 
into such activity that our family and friends and acquaintances would say 
with one accord, "I believe in you." We do well to follow such a counsellor, 
friend and leader. 

R. BLISS WOODS. 















1 1 



Dr. Albert Shipp Pegues 

Dean of Southwestern University 

It takes a poet to teach poetry, and 
that is why school boys, who are by virtue 
of their youthfulness poets, understand the 
Leather Stocking Tales, whereas sophisti- 
cated pundits patronize them. A teacher 
who is "good'' will provoke from those 
students wno are capable of hero-worship 
emulation — not of his eccentricities, as 
L.r.l Frskine incited how many sentiment- 
al young lawyers to wear long white gloves 
into the jury room ; but of his excellencies, 
as Afcelard drew the eager minded youth 
of Prance, even of all Europe, to follow 
hi in, for wisdom's sake, from university to 
university. And if a teacher is a poet, a 
hero, you will find the poet chronicled in 
the student talk at the dinner table; if he 
arouses interest in his subject, as every 
true poet and hero — the two are ever 
largely identical — must arouse, there will 
be violent conflict of ideas. Around the dinner tallies and in the speculative 
rooms of congregation there are in Georgetown this evening, I dare say, warm 
discussion of English literature and the man teaching it — even as there were 
in the sweet days of another generation of collegians. 

In memory I always think of Professor Pegues as reading to the Class 
Chaucer or Wordsworth, or any poet. And as he read, we would sometimes 
look away over the hills stretching to the every luring South, and often we 
would look at his eyes, eloquent witli the drama and poetry of his words. 
Had he done nothing, though, but make us listen to his rare reading, he had 
not been of such worth as a teacher. He made us more than passive listeners; 
he filled us with a positive ambition to know and to imaginatively comprehend 
the facts of what is written. No mere dilletante impressions in that instruc- 
tion ! Here is enthusiasm for a subject born out of a fulness of knowledge 
of that subject — scholarship that is spiritual — whole scholarship. Whoever 
failed as many students as Professor Pegues? Yet whoever made so many 
students sleep with "bokes at their beddes heed"? And many who came to 
get but "credits" remained to love the high and beautiful. 










1 2 



Perhaps the most admirable quality of this contagious enthusiasm is 
that it is curbed to enter into the performance of the endless drudgery con- 
nected with the teaching of English. It has not been many years since the 
head of the department at Southwestern taught practically all the Freshman 
English, Sophomore English, and one or two advanced courses — courses always 
full. Nevertheless the profusion of required themes and examinations were 
always carefully read. "1 always read everything required to be written," 
said Professor Pegues once. 1 remember that one busy commencement he 
told me that in my examination 1 had erred in using "raised" for "reared." 

There is a certain pride, even awesomeness in the man — somehow, to me, 
connotative of Daniel Webster — that makes him stand aloof. Yet I can well 
see his fitness for this later office of dean. One year when he sacrificed to 
superintend Mood Hall he would read the exhilerating ballads of Kipling 
to the fellows that were sick. And 1 know of one youth who was raised up 
from his bed by the roses sent by him and Mrs. Pegues. (It were hard to 
think of him long without thinking too of Mrs. Pegues.) 

Poet, lover and philosopher a strong man of common sense, fierce 
in the advocation of principle, catholic in taste, a fine gentleman, eloquent, 
as inflexible in attendance to unadorned duty as he requires of those under 
him — he stands for a combination of refinement and thoroughness that tran- 
scends "kultur. " 

J. FRANK nORIE. 
















13 





Liberal Arts Faculty 

WESLEY CARROLL VADEN, A. M., 
Professor of Latin and Greek. 
Randolph-Macon College, A. B., 1890; A. M., 
1890; Associate Professor Latin and Greek, Ran- 
dolph-Macon College; Graduate Student Cornell 
University, 1901; Graduate Student, Yale Uni- 
versity, 1905; Professor of Latin and Greek, 
Southwestern University, since 1893. 



STEPHEN H, MOORE, A. M., 
Professor of History. 
Vanderbilt University, A. B., 1894; Columbia 
University, A. M., 1905; Graduate Student Har- 
vard University, summer 1904; University of 
Chicago, summers 1896-97-98-99-1900-03-05; Prin- 
cipal of Southwestern University Fitting School, 
1894-1904; Professor of History, Southwestern 
University, since 1904; Member of American 
Historical Association. 





RUDOLPH WOOD TINSLEY, B. S., 
Professor of Biolcgy and Geology. 
University of Virginia, Graduate in Science, 
1SS3; B. S., 1898; Graduate Student University 
of Chicago, summer 1907; Assistant Professor 
of Science, Washington College, Md., 1893; Pro- 
fessor of Science, University of New Mexico, 
1896-97; Professor of Science, Pennsylvania 
State Normal, 1899-1902; Acting Professor of 
Chemistry and Biology, Southwestern Univer- 
sity, 1903-04; Professor of Biology and Geology, 
1904—; Secretary of Faculty, 1913—. 






l 4 



CLAUDE ANDREW NICHOLS, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Education. 

Southwestern University, A. B., 1898; Gradu- 
ate Student and Fellow Vanderbilt University, 
1898-99; University of Havana, Ph. D., 1905; 
Graduate Student, University of Chicago, sum- 
mers of 1907-08-09; Teachers' College, Columbia 
University, 1913-14; Member of the Society of 
College Teachers of Education, the American 
Sociological Society, and the General Sunday 
School Board of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
South; Professor of Education, Southwestern 
University, since 1908. 











HERBERT LEE GRAY, A. B., 

Professor of Biblical Interpretation and 
Systematic Theology. 

Emory College, A. B., 1887; Professor in An- 
glo-Chinese College, Shanghai, China, 1890-91; 
Professor in Buffington Institute, Soocho w. 
China, 1893-95; Principal, Central Institute, San 
Luis Potosi, Mexico, 1899-1901; Professor in 
Missionary Training School, Nashville, Tenn., 
1907-10; Professor of Biblical Interpretation and 
Systematic Theology, Southwestern University, 
since 1910. 



ROBERT JAY EDDY, A. M., 
Professor of German Language and Literature. 

Robert J. Eddy is a native of Wisconsin; A. B. 
Beloit College, Wisconsin with first honors in 
1895; A. M. Ibid., in 1898; Member of Phi Beta 
Kappa, Beta Chapter of Wisconsin; Summer 
School Oxford University; Studied German un- 
der Schlote at Gottingen, Germany; Student >_f 
French at the Berlitz School of Languages in 
Paris; Graduate Student, University of Wiscon- 
sin; Supervising Principal of Public School Sys- 
tems in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Illinois; Wis- 
consin State Institute Conductor; Vice Princi- 
pal of Beloit College Academy; Assistant to 
Professor of German, Beloit College; Acting 
Professor of French, Beloit College; Elected to 
the Chair of German Language and Literature 
in Southwestern University 1911. 




15 










JOHN COWPER GRANBERY, 

A.M., D.D., Ph.D., 

Professor of Sociology and Economics. 

Randolph-Macon College, A. B., 1896; Vander- 
bilt University, B. D., 1899; University of Chi- 
cago, A. M., 1908; Ph. D., 1909; Kentucky Wes- 
leyan College, D. D., 1913; Acting Professor of 
Education and Assistant Professor of History 
and Economics, Southwestern University, 1913- 
14; Professor of Sociology and Economics, since 
1914. 



JOSEPH LEWELLYN McGHEE, A. B., Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

Emory and Henry College, A. B., 1903; Gradu- 
ate Student University of Chicago, summers 
1905 and 1908; Johns Hopkins University, 1909- 
10-11; Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1910-11; Phi Beta Kappa, 1911; Ph. D., 
1911; Professor of Chemistry, Centenary Col- 
lege, La., 1904-06; Professor of Chemistry, Em- 
ory and Henry College, 1908-09, 1911-13; Profes- 
sor of Chemistry, Southwestern University, 
1913—. 











GEORGE LEWIS BURTON, A. M., 

Professor of Romance Languages. 

Randolph-Macon College, A. B., 1907; A. ML, 
1908; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1912 to Jan. 1915; Instructor, Randolph- 
Macon Academy, Bedford, Va., 1908-12; Fellow 
in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1914; Studied in France, summer of 1914; 
Professor of Romance Languages, Southwestern 
University, since January, 1915. 






1 6 











CHARLES NEWMAN WUNDER, 

A. B., A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Native of Virginia; Randolph-Macon College, 
A. B., 1906; Fellow and Instructor in Astrono- 
my, University of Virginia, 1909-12; M. A., Uni- 
versity of Virginia, 1912; Adjunct Professor of 
Astronomy and Director Leander McCormick 
Observatory, University of Virginia, 1912-13; 
Ph. D., University of Virginia, 1913: Professor 
of Applied Mathematics and Astronomy, David- 
son College, 1913-15; Came to Southwestern 
1916. 





WILLIAM PAUL DAVIDSON, A. B., 
Acting Professor of Philosophy. 
Born in Holly Grove, Arkansas, 1891; Grad- 
uated with A. B. degree from Hendrix College, 
Conway, Ark., 1912; Principal of Crossett, Ark., 
High School, 1912-13-14-15; Graduate Student 
Department of Psychology in University of Chi- 
cago, 1913-14, holding scholarship in the De- 
partment; Elected Acting Professor of Philoso- 
phy in Southwestern University, 1915. 



FREDERICK C, LEHMBERG, A. M., 
Assistant Professor of German and French. 

Southwestern University, A. B., 1900; A. M., 
1912; Graduate Student, University of Texas, 
summer 1910; University of Chicago, summers 
1907-12; Teacher of German, John Tarleton Col- 
lege, 1906-09; Instructor in German and French, 
Southwestern University Fitting School, 1909- 
11; Assistant Professor of German and French, 
Southwestern University, since 1911. 







17 
































MARY SHIPP SANDERS. A. B., 
Assistant Professor of English. 

University of Chicago, A. B., 1906; Graduate 
Student, summer 1909; Columbia University, 
1913-14; Teacher Colegio Palmore, Chihuahua, 
Mexico, 1900-02-03-05-06-08; Instructor in En- 
glish, Southwestern University, 1910; Assistant 
Professor of English, Southwestern University, 
1914—. 



WILLIAM DWIGHT WENTZ, B. E., M. E., 
Instructor in Public Speaking and English. 
Millersville College, M. E., 1898; National Col- 
lege of Elocution and Oratory, B. E., 1907; 
Graduate Student Millersville College 1899-1900; 
Graduate Student University of Pennsylvania, 
1904-05; Instructor in Public Speaking, Wana- 
maker Institute, Philadelphia, 1913; Instructor 
in Public Speaking and English, Southwestern 
University, 1913 — . 





WILLIAM CORNELIUS CORYELL, A. B., 
Instructor in Physics and Mathematics. 

Ohio Wesleyan University, A. B., 1906; In- 
structor in Mathematics, Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, 1904-06; Instructor in Physics, High 
School, Maysville, Kentucky, 1906-08; Student, 
Teachers' College, University of Cincinnati, 
1909; Student of University of Chicago, summer 
1914; George Washington University 1913-15; 
Came to Southwestern in 1916. 



l 8 



J. BURTON RIX, A. B., 
Athletic Director and Instructor' in History. 

Dartmouth School, A. B., 1906; Instructor cf 
Latin and History, Terrill School, Dallas, 
Texas; Instructor of English and History, Aus- 
tin College, Sherman, Texas; Assistant Coach, 
Dartmouth College; Austin College; University 
of Texas; Southwestern University, Athletic Di- 
rector and Instructor in History, since 1914. 











WILBUR F. WRIGHT A. B., 
Registar-Dursar of University. 

A. B., Southwestern University, 1911; Super- 
intendent of Public Schools, Mullin, Texas, 
1911-12; Elected Registar-Bursar of Southwest- 
ern University, August, 1912. 



MRS. MARGARET MOOD McKENNON, A. B., 
Librarian. 

Graduate Southwestern University, A. B.. 
1886; Instructor in Colegio Ingles, San Luis 
Potosi, Mexico, and McDonald Institute, Duran- 
go, Mexico; Student in Education and Library 
Methods, Chicago University, 1900-01; Graduate 
Student University of lillinois, summer 1915. 
Librarian of Southwestern University, 1902. 








o 



19 
















MISS NANNIE GILLESPIE SANDERS, A. B., 
Assistant Librarian. 

Southwestern University, A. B., 1902; Grad- 
uate Student, University of Chicago, summer 
1905; Assistant Librarian, Southwestern Uni- 
versity, since 1912. 



A. DEE SIMPSON 

Native of Texas; Teller First National Bank 
of Georgetown for several years; Cashier First 
National Bank of Mission, Texas; Resigned last 
named position to become Office Secretary of 
the $300,000 Endowment Fund Campaign. 





ROBERT L. BREWER, A. B., 

Southwestern University, 1911; Secretary Stu- 
dents* Y. M. C. A., Oklahoma A. & M. College, 
1911-13; Manager of Mood Hall since 1913. 



ao 




FINE ARTS FACULTY 






ARTHUR LIVINGSTON MANCHESTER, 

Head of Fine Arts Department. 
Musical educator; born Bass River, New Jer- 
sey, February 9, 1862; Was Church Organist at 
thirteen; at Twenty Principal of Music Insti- 
tute of Bever, Pa., Female College. Organized 
Musical Department at Clarion, Pa. Clarion 
State Normal School. Dean of School of Music, 
Converse College, Spartanburg, S. C, and Con- 
ductor South Atlantic States Music Festival, 
January 1904-June 1913. Dean School of Music, 
Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas, 
1913 — . Was Associate Editor of Etude, Phila- 
delphia, four years. Editor of Musician 1896- 
02; The Messenger, 1900-04; Pres. Music Teach- 
ers' National Association; A founder of Ameri- 
can Guild of Organists; Internation Society of 
Musicians. Author — Twelve lessons in the Fun- 
daments of Tone Production; Special Bulletin 
of Status of Music Education in Theory for 
Colleges. From WHO'S WHO IN AMERICA. 





HARRIETT MAY CRENSHAW, 
Instructor in Piano. 
Athens College, Alabama, M. E. L.; Graduat- 
ed in Music, Athens College, Alabama; Studied 
in Conservatory of Music, Nashville, Tenn.; Col- 
lege of Music, Cincinnati, Ohio; Pupil of Her- 
man Klum, of Munich, and Madam Leschetizky, 
of Vienna; Instructor in Piano, Southwestern 
University, 1914 — . 



^ 



DEANA HILL WINFIELD, 
Instructor in Piano. 
Graduated in Music in Elmira College, New 
York; Studied in Berlin; Teacher of Piano, 
Southwestern Seminary, Va., 1910-14; South- 
western University, 1914 — . 










21 




ETELKA EVANS, 
Instructor in Violin. 

Studied in America with Walter Stafford and 
Charles F. Smith; spent three years in Germany 
studying with Emanuel With, Carl Halir, Gus- 
tav Exner; Teacher of Violin in Southern Sem- 
inary, Va., 1911-12; Southwestern University, 
1912—. 



MISS LAURA KUYKENDALL, A. B., 
Instructor in Expression and Director of 

Girls' Gymnasium. 
North Texas Female College, A. B., 1903; 
Graduated in Expression, 1903; Graduated in 
Expression in Southwestern University, 1904; 
Studied in Chicago University, 1913; Instruc- 
tor in Physical Training, Trinity University, 
1913-14; Instructor in Southwestern University, 
since 1914. 











••' ■■ 












YULAN USSERY, 
Instructor in Voice. 

Studied one year in Polytechnic College, Fort 
Worth, Texas; For two years under the instruc- 
tion of Arthur L. Manchester of Southwestern 
University; Graduate in Voice, 1915; Instructor 
in Voice, 1915-16. 



22 





FRED W. BIRKMAN 
English. 

J. D. FOSTER 
Chemistry Storekeeper. 



Student Assistants 

PERCY BLACK 

Chemistry. 

IRENE HENDERSON 
English. 



NELLIE CARR 
Latin. 

W. H. HULL 

Biology. 















23 






















J. L. LYONS 
History. 

ANNIE SMITH 
Geology. 



Student Assistants 

L. C. MERREM 
Economics and Sociology. 

F. H. TUCKER 
Chemistry. 



GLADYS NOWLIN 
French. 

J. C. TUCKER 
Zoology. 



24 










MM 




"Memories 




J®W\ 



26 




MRS. FRANCIS ASBURY MOOD 









26 










TRADITION DEPARTMENT 

In this department are the pictures of a few of Southwestern's friends. To give 
a list of all these loyal sons or to chronicle all the happenings of self-sacrifice and de- 
votion which they have performed would be the task of a much larger book than this. 
There is, therefore, no claim to completeness. 

Southwestern University has its interesting customs, traditions and historical 
background peculiar to its long standing as a religious college. What reminiscences 
the old "Prep" building brings to the students of bygone days! What fancies are 
awakened in the youthful minds of present students when they look upon its ivy-clad 
walls! Here the University had its beginning and here the sainted Mood laid the foun- 
dations for the Central Educational Institution of Texas Methodism and "Humbly invok- 
ing the guidance and approval of Almighty God, and with a single eye to His glory," 
he consecrated Southwestern University to higher Christian education. 

THE EARLY YEARS OF SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Southwestern University was formally opened October 6, 1873 in what is now 
the Preparatory Building. This building was unfinished, on the interior, only two 
stories high, and contained six rooms and an auditorium. The Faculty, the first year, 
consisted of three men, so this space was so much more than was needed, that Dr. 
Mood, had two of the lower rooms plastered and finished, moved his family into them 
and lived here for a year or two. The enrollment the first year, 1873-4, was 33; the 
second year, 63; the third year, 78; the fourth year, 103; the fifth year, 109, making 
a total for these five years of 386. If no name were counted more than once, the net 
enrollment would be less than 200, as some of the students had been in attendance for 
four years, and most of them had been enrolled more than one session. I entered 
the Faculty in the year 1878-79, or the sixth session from the beginning, and as many 
of the first students were from Georgetown, or its vicinity, there are less than 100 stu- 
dents who have enrolled in Southwestern University from its beginning up to the 
present session, whom I have not, in some way, personally touched, only three of the 
living graduates whose diplomas I did not sign, and not a professor or ex-professor with 
whom I was not well acquainted, having served the institution with all but two. 

When I reached Georgetown, more than 37 years ago, a slow January rain was 
falling. There were no sidewalks in those days, the mud was black and deep, and when 
it rained it became, as they say in Arkansas, "gormy." My first sensation, on stepping 
from the train, was that of disgust, for I found that the mud, rapidly accumulated 
on my feet with every step I took, and would not be shaken off. 









27 
















When Dr. Mood greeted me, his first question was "Well, how do you like Texas?" 
I replied, "Oh, the mud! the mud!" He ansewred at once: "But, there is corn and 
cotton and wheat and oats in this mud." And so at the start I found that he was an 
optimist. 

The first chapel service 1 attended, a young, rosy cheeked, round faced student, 
dressed in round-about coat and gray trousers presided at the organ and led the singing, 
i soon learned that his name was John Barcus. He selected and announced the hymn, 
and when Professor Bryce turned to it, I noticed that he was convulsed. There had 
been a fight, that morning, between two of the prominent youngsters of the lower classes, 
and Bryce had heard about it. I saw the reason when I turned to the hymn in the 
little thick song-book we used, and read the opening lines: 

"Let dogs delight, to bark and bite, 
For 'tis their nature to. 

Fighting was not uncommon in those days, and while fighting was always very 
strongly disapproved, it was then generally agreed that there were a good many things 
worse than fighting, provided no serious damage was meant or incurred. 

In these early days the typical East Texas boy was very different from the typical 
West Texas boy. The former came from the farm and the latter from the ranch. 

The farm boy was generally dependent. He would come directly from the railroad 
station to the President, or some professor, armed with a letter of introduction, and 
would ask for help in securing a boarding place. Later he would want help and advice 
about the course of study, and suggestions about matters of behavior, associations and 
college rules. 

The ranch boy, before the days of wire fences, when it was the rule to "ride lines," 
was self-reliant and resourceful. 

When he would report to the President's office, and Dr. Mood would ask him if 
he wanted help in securing a boarding house, he would reply, briskly, "I have arranged 
all that, Doctor." Then when asked about his course of study the answer would be, 
"I wrote for a catalogue and have all that planned." His work on the big ranches 
had made him alert, the only trouble with him was the difficulty of holding him in 
college through the four-year course, as the "call of the ranch" was often too strong to 
be resisted. 

Dr. Mood offered, among other studies, a course in elementary moral philosophy 
especially for the Freshmen, which he taught himself. He wanted to reach and in- 
fluence this class in every way he could, A few days after the opening, in calling the 
roll, lie would ask each young man, two questions, "Have you a Bible?" "Have you a 
pistol?" and insist upon candid answers. He would urge each young man who had 
no Bible, to at once, supply himself with one, and each member of the class who had 
a pistol to bring it to him and allow him to keep it until the close of the school, as 
there could be no use for it as long as the student remained in school. He generally 
obtained good results from this lecture. 












28 






It was in September, 1880, that after Dr. Mood had made the usual call to the 
class, Eugene Baker appeared at the President's office with his six-shooter and with 
some show of pride said: "Here is my gun, Doctor," handed it to him. The Doctor, 
looking at it askance, inquired "Is it loaded?" "Yes sir," Baker answered. Dr. Mood, 
with some show of alarm, hastily stepped back and said: "Mr. Baker, take the loads 
out, and then bring it tome." Eugene stepped over to the window, tossed it up and 
reaching out with the pistol, there was "bang! bang! bang! bang." He handed the pistol 
to Dr. Mood and said with an air of satisfaction, "The loads are all out, Doctor." It 
is perhaps needless to say that Baker was a West Texas boy. 

Every year, in the early eighties, witnessed a growth in the attendance of students 
as well as in number in the Faculty. In 1881 the third story and mansard roof was 
added to the old college building, and much ado was made over this visible mark of 
progress. The first college periodical was issued monthly and called "The Alamo and 
yan Jacinto Monthly." A name too long, but nothing shorter could be agreed upon 
that would include both literary societies. The first number, issued in November, 188::, 
was gotten out by a committee composed of R. A. John, James R. Hamilton, H. L,. 
Mosely and W. E. Hawkins of the Alamo Society, and B. L. Davis, R. E. Brooks, W. D. 
Coats and C. D. Smith of the San Jacinto Society. 

From the committee of eight, six have developed into very prominent lawyers, 
whose names are known throughout Texas. 

W. E. Hawkins, now one of the Associate Judges in the Supreme Court of Texas, 
was very active in getting out the first number, and he gathered to gether the sheets 
of the first copy as they came from the press. He probably has this copy yet, as he 
proposed to keep it always as a souvenir. 

Among the articles contributed the very first year were: "Religious Education, 
the Safeguard of the Nation," by John M. Barcus, now a Doctor of Divinity, and one 
of the prominent preachers of the State; "An Age of Progress," by W. E. Hawkins; 
"Texas and Her Sons," by R. L. Henry, now a prominent member of Congress, and a 
candidate for the United States Senate; "Life as Influenced by Temperature," by B. L. 
Davis, now a leading lawyer of Corsicana; "The Spirit of Discovery," by W. C. McKamy, 
now an ex-State Senator and well known business man of Dallas; "Ideality," by R. A. 
John, now a prominent corporation lawyer of Houston; "Have an Aim in Life," by 
C. K. Lee, now a Railroad Lawyer of Fort Worth; "Who Shall Lead Us?" by Frank 
Andrews, now a leading member of one of the strongest law firms of Houston; "The 
Progress of Mind," by R. E. Brooks, now one of the most prominent and successful 
business men of Houston and an Ex-District Judge; "My Country, My God," by James R. 
Hamilton, now a leading lawyer in Central Texas, and a successful district attorney. 
In the third of a century since this first volume was published this college monthly, 
now called "Southwestern University Magazine," has not failed to make its monthly 
appearance throughout each college year and many of the brightest minds of Texas 






29 





















have contributed original articles to its pages, and the above list of subjects, and names 
that have become prominent, could be extended indefinitely. 

Declamation was greatly stressed, daily in the chapel, weekly in the society halls, 
and annually in the contests. All the old students remember how Will McKamy and 
Bob Knight, in successive years spoke "My Country! My Mother!! My God!!!" or "Shall 
Our Laurels Wither?" that, perhaps was introduced by M. L. Bateman, and became so 
popular that Dr. Mood denounced it as "a piece of empty, oratorical bombast" and barred 
it from further appearances upon the college stage. 

In those days, as commencement approached, the secluded places along the banks 
of the San Gabriel were constantly echoing with college oratory as the boys practiced 
for the coming contests. It was a little later that Sam Thomas was reciting Munsey's 
"Lost Soul" in a dense thicket just beyond the limits of North Georgetown, at a twilight 
hour, when a wagon load of kind hearted country folk returning home, hearing him 
shrieking through the gathering darkness "Lost! Lost!" rushed frantically to his rescue. 
Of course Sam enjoyed their discomfiture. 

In those early days a great deal of interest was taken in the debating societies. 
The champion debate between representatives of the Alamo and San Jacinto Societies 
was the most prominent feature of the whole college year. It would be interesting, if 
the limits of this paper allowed, to give the weighty questions, such as "Shall the Tariff 
be Abolished?" and like themes, and the names of the debaters, from year to year. 

Time and the fruitage has shown that the Faculty and the students worked hard 
and to some purpose in these early years. Occasionally there were bright things said 
and done that were not all together in harmony with the situation, as the following 
paper handed in thirty-three years ago, written during the hour assigned to an exam- 
ination in mathematics. The writer is one of the brightest and loveliest women that ever 
attended Southwestern University, and in spite of her dislike for mathematics, she has 
splendidly filled her sphere in life, and today is filling the honorable estate of grand- 
mother: 

"Can I ever forget this Examination? 

Not while time lends his fleet wings to me, 
How we sat in the school room this evening 

With faces disconsolate to see. 

On the blackboard are hideous questions 

About secants and tangents and sines 
And Mercy knows that all the answers 

Have fled from our terrified minds. 

There Ada and Fannie and Ella — 

With ink all over their clothes, 
And Maggie, the Regent's bright daughter 

With beautiful hair and straight nose. 

And Linnie, a Professor's sister, — 

Surely her's is an enviable lot, 
With her front hair all done up in papers, 

And the rest in a comical knot. 












30 









And Fannie, a Professor's intended 

With eyes of cerulean blue, 
Her bearing, majestic and graceful, 

And a hole in the sole of her shoe. 

And Maggie, with peepers the brownest, 

Her pen resting over her ear 
Seems lost in the big unit circle, 

With functions and formulae near. 

I sit with my pen clutched, the wildest, 
My hair scattered over the floor, — 

In despair, I've unwittingly mixed it 

With the trash 'tween my seat and the door. 

Forgive me, this once more, I implore you, — 

I remember the time in the past 
That you would forgive me and help me, 

And yet I break promises, alas! 
* # * & * * * * 

C. C. CODY. 




SOUTHWESTERN BOOTH IN GALVESTON COTTON CARNIVAL 



31 






Southwestern Men Who Have Made Good 










T. JEFF ADICKES, Huntsville, Texas. Fine Student; Splendid Personality. 

WILBUR, P. ALLEN, Austin, Texas. Grand Consul of Sigma Chi Fraternity 
of America; Member of Finance Committee of Southwestern University; 
Banker; Capitalist. 

WILLIAM H. ATWELL, Dallas, Texas. B. S. 1887; Lawyer; Ex-United 
States District Attorney; Prominent in Railroad Circles. 

JOHN M. BARCUS, Hillsboro, Texas. A. M. 1882 ; Member of Board of Trus- 
tees; Pastor First Methodist Church, Hillsboro, Texas. 

R, P. BREWER, McAlester, Oklahoma. B. S. 1898; President First National 
Bank, McAlester, Oklahoma. 

JUDGE R. II. BURNEY, Kerrville, Texas. A. B. 1879 ; Prominent Lawyer. 

HON. A. L. CAMP, Fort Worth, Texas. B. S. 1888; Lawyer; Prominent Cat- 
tleman. 
ROBERT L. McDANIEL, Victoria, Texas. B. S. 1891 ; Prominent Lawyer. 

JUDGE W. L. DEAN, Huntsville, Texas. A. B. 1890 ; Lawyer ; Member Board 

of Trustees. 
JUDGE S. W. DEAN, Madisonville, Texas. A. B. 1890 ; Judge Twelfth Judicial 

District, Madison County. 






32 










Southwestern Men Who Have Made Good 



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B. D. DASH1ELL, Jacksonville, Texas. Member of First Graduating Class, 
1876 ; Prominent Lawyer. 

JUDGE DAVIS E. DECKER, Quanah, Texas. B. S. 1888 ; District Judge. 

CAPT. T. S. GARRISON, Timpson, Texas. Prominent Methodist in East 
Texas; Former Trustee of Southwestern University; Patron of School. 

W. S. GIBBS, Huntsville, Texas. Ex-Trustee ; Banker ; Son of Mrs. Sandford 
Gibbs, the founder of a Loan Fund at Southwestern. 

REV GLENN FLINN, Beaumont, Texas. A. B. 1900 ; Pastor First Methodist 
Church, Beaumont. 

JUDGE WILLIAM G. HAWKINS, Austin, Texas. B. S. 1884 ; Justice Supreme 
Court of Texas. 

HON. R. L. HENRY, Waco, Texas. A. M. 1885 ; Member of United States Con- 
gress ; Prominent Candidate for Senate. 

WM. C. HOGG, Houston, Texas. Lawyer; Oil Magnate; Son of Former Gov- 
ernor Hogg. 

MRS. ROBERT A. JOHN, Houston, Texas. 

ROBT. A. JOHN, Houston, Texas. Corporation Lawyer ; Ex- Assistant Attor- 
ney General; Attorney for the Texas Company. 









33 






Southwestern Men Who Have Made Good 



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HON. R, E. L. KNIGHT, Dallas, Texas. A. M. 1886; Lawyer; Director of 
Dallas State Fair. 

HON. .10HN M. MATHIS, Brenham, Texas. A. B. 1890; Member of Legis- 
lature. 

HON. EARLE B. MAYFIELD, Austin, Texas. Lawyer; Railroad Commissioner 
of the State of Texas. 

ED. McCULLOUGH, Waco, Texas. First Honors, 1897; Banker; Planter; 
Lumberman. 

JUDGE THOMAS L. McCULLOUGH, Waco, Texas. B. S. 1889 ; County Judge, 
McLennan County, Texas; President of Board of Trustees. 

REV. R. G. MOOD, Sherman, Texas. Presiding Elder Sherman District, North 
Texas Conference ; Trustee of University. 

WILLIAM S. NELMS, Atlanta, Georgia. A. B., A. M. 1904; Professor of 
Physics, Georgia School of Technology ; Ph. D. Columbia University, 
1913. 

REV. F. S. ONDERDONK, San Antonio, Texas. Missionary to Mexico, Super- 
intendent of Mission Work in Texas; Former Commissioner of Univer- 
sity. 

HON. WILL E. ORGAIN, Beaumont, Texas. Lawyer; Trustee of University 
for many years. 



34 








Southwestern Men Who Have Made Good 







Albert G. SANDERS, Emory, Virginia. A. B. 1904; Professor of Greek at 
Emory and Henry College, Emory, Virginia; First Rhodes Scholar from 
Southwestern University. 

JAMES SHELTON, Houston, Texas. Active Business Man. 

D. H. SNYDER, Georgetown, Texas. One of the early friends of Southwestern; 

Member of the Board of Trustees for many years, being Treasurer of the 
Board for a large part of the time ; An earnest friend of the founder, 
Dr. Mood; Throughout its existence has given his best thought and 
much time for its furtherance; has been a great patron of the School. 

J. W. SNYDER, Georgetown, Texas. With his brother, D. H. Snyder, was one 
of the most prominent early friends of the College; Was Trustee and 
Member of Executive Committee for many years ; great patron of School. 

SAM STREETMAN, Houston, Texas. Member of Law Firm of Andrews, 
Streetman, Burns and Logue ; Considered among best trial lawyers in 
Texas. 

CLYDE S. SWEETEN, Austin, Texas. A. B. 1898; Lawyer; Assistant At- 
torney General. 

JUDGE ROSSER THOMAS, Brenham, Texas. A. B. 1889 ; Lawyer ; Journalist. 

JUDGE CHAS. A. WILCOX, Austin, Texas. A. B. 1894 ; Judge of Tenth Dis- 
trict, Austin, Texas. 

E. C. WILM, Boston, Mass. A. B., A. M., 1902 ; Ph. D. Cornell ; LL. D. South- 

western ; Borden P. Bowne Chair of Philosophy in Boston University. 


















36 
















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Students' Association 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Raymond Brewer, Hattie Nelms, Fred Francis. 

OFFICERS 

J. L. Lyons President 

J. L. Spivey Vice-President 

Marion Mallard Secretary 

The Students' Association is composed of every student in the college. 
This organization elects the staffs of the various publications, elects the Uni- 
versity Honor Council, and in general controls the activities of the students. 









37 

















UNIVERSITY HONOR COUNCIL 









38 









University Honor Council 



E. C. Clabaugh Jr., President 

SENIOR CLASS REPRESENTATIVES 
Fred Francis Mary Davidson 



J UN 10R REPRESENTATIVES 



Eugene Perrin 



Mary Watson 



SOPHOMORE REPRESENTATIVES 
H. R. Knickerbocker Ruth Onderdonk 






FRESHMAN REPRESENTATIVES 
A. B. Knickerbocker Lila Bass 



The Honor Council acts in all cases of cheating either on examination 
or daily recitation. Though rarely called upon to act the system has been 
effective in stimulating true honor among the student body. It acts in co- 
operation with the Faculty. It is controlled by the Students' Association 
who elects the president, while the other members are elected by the various 
classes. 






39 













Woman's Self-Government Association 

OFFICERS 

President Kittle Cain 

Vice-Pres Ruth Goddard 

Secretary and Treasurer Hazel Davis 

Outdoor Censorship Fannie Lee Wilson 

Indoor Censorship Hattie Stanford 

Sunday Monitor Tennie Mae Bass 

WOMAN'S HONOR COUNCIL 

President Elizabeth Smyrl 

SENIOR CLASS REPRESENTATIVES 

Mary Davidson Anne McClendon 

JUNIOR CLASS REPRESENTATIVES 

Ruth Simmons Mary Lynn Walker 

SOPHOMORE CLASS REPRESENTATIVES 
Carrie Rogers Lulah Rothehild 

FRESHMAN CLASS REPRESENTATIVES 

Grace Lemmon Helen Oat man 

FITTING SCHOOL REPRESENTATIVES 
Dixie Tucker Margaret Adams 






40 
















WOMAN'S HONOR COUNCIL 



41 














Mood Hall Honor Council 









OFFICERS 

Stanley Haver President 

Angie Smith, Jr Vice-President 

Will Matlock Secretary 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

W. W. Simmons, Stanley Coughran, A. P. Black, Jr., Fred Francis, 

A. Ward Wilson. 

This council, acting in cooperation with the University authorities, 
controls the activities of the students in the men's dormitory. 















4*2 










MOT/Ort P/CTURCS OF SAr/TA A/Y/Vfi 

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ST</PENT 
RIGHTS 



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MR. COOP&V 

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43 

















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Alamo Literary Society 



ALAMO PRESIDENTS 
A. D. 1873-1916 

H. G. Simpson, R, B. Gilbreath, Fred Francis, Stanley Coughran, W. M. Slagle. 

COLORS— Black and white. 
MOTTO — "Let men learn virtue by association." 

YELL. 

Hullabaloo, Ro, Ro, 
Hullabaloo, Ro, Ro, 

Hero, Hero, 
Three cheers for the Alamo! 


















44 







Alamo Literary Society 

OFFICERS 1915-16 

SEPTEMBER 

H. G. Simpson President A. B. Partain Secretary 

L. A. Boone Vice-President Fred Francis Critic 

NOVEMBER 

R. B. Gilbreath President Ben Laws Secretary 

Fred Francis Vice-President E. C. Clabaugh Critic 

JANUARY 

Fred Francis President C. R. Hooten Secretary 

Ben Leigh Vice-President Walton Day : Critic 

MARCH 

Stanley Coughran President Roy Jobson Secretary 

T. Lee Vice-President C. R. Hooten Critic 

MAY 

W. M. Slagle President James Barcus 

R. D. Hodges Vice-President C. R. Hooten 

Stanley Coughran Treasurer (entire session) 



Atkinson, S. 
Avant, J. A. 
Barcus, J. R. 
Bayless, Norman 
Boone, L. A. 
Brewer, Raymond 
Clabaugh, E. C. 
Clark, C. R. 
Collier, J. F. 
Cowan, J. B. 
Coughran, S. 
Day, W. 
Dawson, W. A. 
Dunnam, S. M. 
Ellyson, John 
Francis, Fred 



ROLL 
Gilbreath, R. B. 
Gilchrist, S. S. 
Harwell, J. G. 
Harwell, W. B. 
Hooten, C. R. 
Hoyle, Archie 
Huckabee, E. 
Harris, John 
Jobson, Roy 
Laws, Ben 
Leigh, Ben 
Lee, T. 

Manchester, A. K. 
Manchester, F. A. 
Mallard, J. F. 



Mitchell, T. M. 
McDonold, J. A. 
McDaniel, H. 
Miller, C. L. 
Partain, A. B. 
Parker, L. G. 
Slack, W. B. 
Staples, C. S. 
Smith, W. A. 
Straw, Henry 
Spivey, J. L. 
Slagle, W. M. 
Simpson, H. G. 
Wilson, A. W. 
Watson, William. 


















46 



















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46 



















Alamo Intermediate Debate 






Orator C. R. Clark 

DEBATE 
Resolved: That the Provisions of the Gibson Bill are more desirable 
for the people of Texas than the Robertson Law. 



Affirmative 
ROY JOBSON 
W. B. SLACK 
J. A. AVANT 



Negative 
NORMAN BAYLESS 
A. K. MANCHESTER 
JOHN ELLYSON 



47 



















San Jacinto Literary Society 

SAN JACINTO PRESIDENTS. 
W. W. Jackson, L. C. Merrem, Prank Callcott, Lee Edens, Hugh S. Carter 

MOTTO — "Perfect eloquence clothes man with kingly power." 

COLORS — Old rose and pearl gray. 

YELL. 

Hullabaloo, BlickdJack, 
Hullabaloo, Blickddack, 
San Jac, San Jac, Tigers. 






48 



San Jacinto Literary Society 



OFFICERS FOR 1915-16 



SEPTEMBER 

W. W. Jackson President 

Stanley Haver Vice-President 



Reuben Gray Secretary 

F. W. Birkman Critic 



NOVEMBER 



L. C. Merrem President 

H. S. Edge Vice-President 



H. R. Knickerbocker Secretary 

Claude Willis Critic 



JANUARY 



Frank Callcott President 

J. G. Timmons Vice-President 



Hartman Kilgore Secretary 

H. R. Knickerbocker Critic 



MARCH 



Lee Edens President 

C. B. Harbour Vice-President 



W. H. Callcott Secretary 

W. W. Jackson Critic 



MAY 



Hugh S. Carter President 

B. W. Bode Vice-President 



L. D. Hardt Secretary 

L. C. Merrem Critic 



Averyt A. N. 
Birkman F. W. 
Biggs, R. D. 
Bode, E. W. 
Callcott, Frank 
Callcott, W. H. 
Carter, H. S. 
Chisholm, D. A. 
DeVore, H. S. 
Eden, Lee 
Edge, H. S. 
Gray, R. W. 
Harbour, C. B. 
Hardt, Wesley 
Hardy, L. D. 



ROLL 

Grote, Wesley 
Kilgore, Hartman 
Haver, Stanley 
Highsmith, W. S. 
Jackson, W. W. 
Knickerbocker, H. R. 
Martin, T. R, 
Mason, J. J. 
McLean, J. H. 
Merrem, L. C. 
Merrem, W. E. 
Merritt, J. G. 
Mumme, Alfred 
Partin R. O. 
Rice, M. H. 



Shell, Elmer 
Smith, C. V. 
Stindt, W. H. 
Willis, Claude 
Nevil, W. M. 
McNeil, Clare 
Crook, W. W. 
Taylor, R. L. 
Ridgeway, F. A. 
Bailey, A. W. 
English, A. B. 
Dye, U. B. 
King, S. H. 
Smith, R. N. 
Timmons, J. G. 












49 

















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San Jacinto Intermediate Debate 

Oration W. H. Stint. 

DEBATE 
Resolved: That the railway systems of the United States should be 
owned and controled by the Federal Government. (Constitutionality conceded.) 









Affirmative : 
W. E. MERREM 
C. B. HARBOUR 
H. R. KNICKERBOCKER 



Negative 
J. G. TIMMONS 
K L. TAYLOR 
C. VAL SMITH 



m 



61 



















Brooks Prize Debate 



ALAMO vs. SAN JACINTO 



Resolved: That the Federal Government should own and control the 
telegraph and telephone systems — (Constitutionality conceded.) 



Affirmative : 
A. WARD WILSON 
FRED FRANCIS 



Alamo 



Negative 
H. S. DeVORE I 

L. C. MERREM I 



San Jacinto 






b-A 










Oratorical Association 

OFFICERS 

A. W. Wilson President 

W. W. Jackson Vice-President 

Angie Smith, Jr Secretary-Treasurer 

The Oratorical Association of Southwestern University is composed of 
the members of the Alamo and San Jacinto Literary Societies, and has for its 
purposes the furthering of the oratorical interests of its members, it arranges 
and provides for the inter-collegiate debates and each year sends an orator to 
the convention of the Texas Inter-collegiate Oratorical Association. 





















53 

























Triangular Debate 



Resolved: That the several states should adopt schedules of minimum 
wages for unskilled labor. (Constitutionality conceded.) 



Affirmative Team 
At Georgetown 
W. ANGIE SMITH 
C. A. WILLIS 
Southwestern vs. 
Texas Christian LIniversity 

Decision in favor of Negative. 



Negative Team 
At Waxahachie 
R. W. GRAY 
BEN LEIGH 

Southwestern vs. 

Trinity College. 

Decision ; Affirmative, 2 ; Negative, I 












54 



















Baylor Debate 



Resolved: That the United States is justifiable in sending- munition of 
war to the belligerant nations in the European conflict. (Constitutionality 
Conceded.) 

Southwestern Debaters — Affirmative Team. 

At Georgetown. 

E. C. Clabaugh (Alamo) W. W. Jackson (San Jacinto) 









55 













" 

Clio Literary Society 

CLIO PRESIDENTS 

Carol Smith First Term 

Hattie Stanford Second Term 

Ruth Goddard Third Term 

Anne McClendon Fourth Term 

MOTTO :— ' ' Volamus alisspropiss" 

COLORS:— Pink and Cray 

FLOWER :— Pink Carnation. 









sa 







Clio Literary Society 





CLIO ROLL 






Inez Ayres 


lone Irwin 


Rubidick Richards 




Margaret Adams 


Lorena Isom 


Helen Robertson 




Annie Laurie Bass 


Lillian Jennings 


Annie Sealy 




Mary Blaine 


Ida Mai Lee 


Ruth Simmons 




Hilda Barton 


Lucy Lee 


Carol Smith 




Lucile Chapman 


Om-a Landrum 


Vera Smith 




Coryne Castilow 


Grace Lemmon 


Hattie Stanford 




Hazel Davis 


Marian Mallard 


Elizabeth Smyrl 




Annie Cecil Evans 


Ruth McMillian 


Ruth Story 




Ruth Goddard 


Myrtle Moss 


Dixie Tucker 




Ruth Glenn 


Anne McClendon 


Fannie Lee Wilson 




Gladys Hardeman 


Helen Oatman 


Belle Wright 




Mark Hubbard 


Ruth Parr 


Charlotte Stiles. 




Aliene Haygood 


Carrie Rogers 







b t 


























Alethean Literary Society 

ALETHEAN PR ESIDENTS 
Tennie Mae Bass, Ruth Blanks, Rowena Onderdonk, Inez Dunlap. 

MOTTO: "I would rather be than seem to be." 

COLORS— Dark Blue And White 






Flower — Blue Bonnet. 












68 








Alethean Literary Society 



ALETHEAN ROLL 



Dorothea Bishop 

Ruth Blanks 

Mae Lewis Barnes 

Tennie Mae Bass 

Wille Blount 

Arrie Barrett 

Travis Cottrell 

Bernice Cook 

Mary Dunlap 

Bessio Davis 

Nelia Francis Davidson 

Leta De Vilbis 

Cornelia Cayden 

Jane Johnson 



Margaret McKinnon 
Allie McKinley 
Elsie Miller 
Weezie Parr 
Lillian Parr 
Roberta Partain 
Lula Rothchild 
Agnes Smith 
Lucile Stephens 
Mary Watson 
Ruth Onderdonk 
Lois Punchard 
Louise Punchard 
Mary Lynn Walker. 












69 




























THE LECTURE COMMITTEE 



60 




The Lecture Committee 

The University has been rarely fortunate this year in the class of talent 
that has appeared upon its platform. 

All musical numbers are under the direction of Arthur L. Manchester, 
Dean of Fine Arts Department, Below is THE ARTIST CONCERT SERIES 
for 1915-1916. ' 

October, 14: — Miss Marguerite Dunlap ; Contralto. 

December 9 : — Harry Evans, Basso-Cantante, and Otto L. Fisher, Pianist. 

February 14 : — Flonzaley String Quartet : Adolfo Betti, Violin ; Alfred 
Pochon, Violin; Ugo Ara, Viola; Iwan D'Archambeau, Violencello. 

February 25: — Fuller Sisters: Misses Dorothy Fuller, Rosalind Fuller, 
Cynthia Fuller. 

The Lecture Committee under the active supervision of Professor S. H. 
Moore has brought the following speakers to the University this year. 

Dr. J. L. Kesler, Dean of the Academic Department, Baylor University, 
Waco. 

Dr. R. W. Caldwell, Professor of History in Rice Institute, Houston. 

Dr. Peter McQueen, War Correspondent and Lecturer, New York. 

Dr. I. H. Haven, Corresponding Secretary of the American Bible Society, 
New York. 

Dr. J. L. Keasby, Professor of Institutional History in University ot 
Texas, Austin. 

William Jennings Bryan delivered his lecture on "The Making of a 
Man", Washington, D. C. 

Dr. H. A. Shands, formerly Professor of English in Southwestern Uni- 
versity, now of Houston. 

Dr. S. A. Steele, Pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, Co- 
lumbus, S. C. 

Dr. E. L. Gilcreest, Surgeon and member of Red Cross Corps in European 
War, Gainesville, Texas. 

Dr. Stockton Axson, Professor of English in Rice Institute, Houston. 

The Ben Greet Woodland Players in Shakespearean drama, New York. 

The Lecture Committee is composed of two members from each of the 
four Literary Societies. The personnel of the committee for 1915-1916 : Misses 
Roberta Partain, Ida Mae Lee, Ruth Onderdonk, Lucile Chapman; Messrs 
L. A. Boone (Chairman), W. W. Jackson, W. A. Smith, Jr., F. W. Birkman. 









61 




























MARSHALS 



62 













A COLLEGE EDITOR 















63 



















THE MAGAZINE STAFF 









64 




Southwestern University Magazine 

Published Monthly 

By 

The Literary Societies 

of 

Southwestern University 

9f 

STAFF FOR YEAR OF 1915 AND 1916. 

Leslie A. Boone Editor-in-Chief 

Travis Cottrell Assistant Editor 



.Associate Editors 



Ruth Goddard 
C. Val Smith 
Ruth Blanks 
Fred Francis 



Fred W. Birkman Business Manager 



Claude Willis 
W. B. Slack 
W. H. Stindt 
T. Lee, Jr. 



Assistant Business Managers 
























65 










THE MEGAPHONE STAFF 






66 









The Megaphone 



Published every Tuesday by the 



STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION 



OP SOUTH WESTERN UNIVERSITY. 



STAKE FOR THE YEAR 1915-1916. 

Henry Straw Editor-in-Chief 

Harold Dayvault Business Manager. 



Assistant Editors 



R. E. Brown 
Allan Manchester 
Renfro Knickerbocker 
Travis Cottrell 

Mark Hubbard Special Editor 

Haywood McDaniel 

Percy Black L Assistant Business Managers 

Laucile Elrod 



67 















THE SENIOR STAFF 



68 







The Senior 

Published daily 
During Commencement Week 
By 
The Senior Class. 

IT- 



STAFF FOR THE YEAR 1915-1916. 
Roberta Partain Editor-in-Chief 

TnezDunlap 1 Assistant Editors 

W. M. Single J 

E. C. Clabaugh Business Manager 

Ruth Story ] Assistant Managers 

J. L. Spivey 






69 






















1916 SOU'WESTER BOARD OF PUBLICATION 






70 






The Sou'wester 

Published Annually 

by 
The Students' Association 

of 
Southwestern University. 

If 









Sou'wester Board of Publication for the Year 1915-1916 

1 1 ugh S. Carter Edit or-in-Chief 

A. Ward Wilson ; Business Manager 



Frank Ragsdale 
W. W. Crook 

Rowena Onderdonk 
R. E. Brown 
W. A. Smith 

Tennie Mae Bass 
T. Lee, Jr. 
C. R. Hooten 



Art Editors 



Assistant Editors 



Assistant Business Managers 






71 














PRESS CLUB GROUP 

The Press Club 

OFFICERS 

Hugh S. Carter President 

Ruth Blanks Vice-President 

Tennie Mae Bass Secretary-Treasurer 

A. Ward Wilson | 

P ra 1 1 k Etagsdal e | Delegates 

W. B. Slack i 






The Press Club of Southwestern is composed of the members of the 
various staffs of the college publications. It was organized to promote the 
mutual interests of the differenl publications. The Press Club is represented 
at the annual convention of the Texas Inter-Collegiate Press Club Association 
by an executive member and a speaking delegate, and it has entries in the 
Inter-Collegiate prize essay, poem and story contests. 



7 3 



THE PEER'S 




























73 






















































74 






PLEDGES: 

Carter, J. Olin Mitchell, Lunn II. 

Quinn, Pat S. Scale, E. Y. 

Gillett, John 



Kappa Alpha 

Pounded a1 Washington and Lee, December 21, 1865 

XI CHAPTER. 

Established 1883. 

MOTTO: 

"Uieu et les Dames." 

COLORS : 
Crimson and Gold. 

YELL 

High rickety ! Whoop la lay ! 

What's the matter with old K. 'A.? 

Vive la, Vive la, Vive la, say ! 

Kappa Alpha; rah, rah, ray! 

KRATRES IN URBE. 
W. R. Mood E. J. Snyder C. A. Nichols 

FRATRES IN IJNIVERSITATE: 

Tucker, Henry 

Smith, W. A. Laws, Ben C. 

Barcus, James Watson, W. E. 

Straw, Henry Coffee, Rector 

Forester, Jesse Knickerbocker, H. R 

Lyons, .1. L. 






75 
















76 




Phi Delta Theta 

Founded at Miami University, 1848. 

TEXAS GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established April, 1886 

FLOWER: 

White Carnation 

COLORS: 
Azure and Argent 

FRATRES IN URBE 

D. W. Wilcox S. V. Stone 

D. K. Wilcox ( ). Kennedy 

R. L. Brewer 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

C. C, Cody EL L. Gray 

W. C. Vaden Frank Seay 

M. D. Cody W. F. Wright 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE : 

Burns, J. G. Prideaux, C. C. 

Jenkins, E. G. Bounds, C. I. 

Hoyle, Archie Brewer, Raymond 

Partain, A. B. Burns, Arthur 

Hay, S. R. Jr. Jacques, Raymond 

Hodge, R. D. Williams, Paine 

McLarty, Sinks Leeson, J. T. 
LeTulle, V. S. 

PLEDGES : 

Drake, Sam Dawson, Artis 

Belford, William Mallard, J. J. 

King, F. H. Miller, C. L. 



77 




















Spivey 



Manchester R 



I(DTA 

15-16 




Carter 




J&ML 















78 






Kappa Sigma 



S. A. Hodges 



Founded at University of Virginia, 1869 

IOTA CHAPTEE 
Established 1886 

COLORS: 

Scarlet, White and Emerald Green 

FLOWER: 
The Lily of the Valley 

YELL 

Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Crescent and Star; 

Vive la ! Vive la ! 

Kappa Sigma. 

FRATRES IN URBE 
M. F. Smith 



W. T. Jones 



ALUMNUS ADVISER 

M. F. Smith 



FRATER IN FACULTATE 

Prof. S. H. Moore 









FRATRES IN UNIVERS1TATE 



Bishop, E. Hendrix 
Boone, Leslie A. 
Carter, Hugh S. 
Clark, L. C. 
Coughran, M. S. 
Coughran, J. A. 
Dayvault, Harold 

Gilliland, G. I. 



Ellis, H. E. 
Hightower, Paul 
Manchester, F. A. 
Manchester, A. K. 
Matlock, W. T. 
Seale, Roy E. 
Spivey, J. L. 



PLEDGES: 

Bass, W. G. Harris, J. H. 

Chapman, Dow Jones, H. S. 

Crook, W. W. Knickerbocker, A. B. 

Eastman, C. V. McKenzie, D. A. 

Thompson, F. A. 



79 . 



































80 



Pi Kappa Alpha 

Founded at University of Virginia, March 1, 1868 

ALPHA OMICKON CHAPTER 

Established November 12, 1910 






FLOWER : 
Lily of the Valley 



COLORS: 
Garnet and Old Gold 






FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE : 



Armstrong, J. E. 
Baker, Paul 
Bayless, Norman 
Brown, R. E. 
Clabaugh, E. C. Jr. 
Clabaugh, J. U. 
Clark, Richard 
Collier, F. G. 
Cowan, J. B. 
DeVore, H. S. 
Gardner, H. L. 



Gilbreath, R, B. 
Gray, R, W. 
Hartzo, Z. A. 
Hooten, C. R. 
Hull, W. II. 
Marsh, M. W. 
McDauiel, II. 
Means, V. R. 
Sessions, G. S. 
Tucker, J. C. 
Turner, E. R, 












81 























BISHOP 

ALtlMiR 



pum<mimn 



jeiftihtos m 












8 2 







Delta Delta Delta 

Founded 1888 

THETA EPSILON CHAPTER 

Established in 1912 by merging of Alpha Delta Chapter of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma, which was established in 1905 

COLORS : 

Silver, Gold and Blue 

FLOWER : 

Pansy 



Mrs. Pegues 



PATRONESSES 
Mrs. Hensehen 



Mrs. Wenlz 



SORORES IN UNI VERS LTATE: 



Cottrell, Travis 
Cain, Kit tie 
Dunlap, Inez 
Dunlap, Mary 
Onderdonk, Rowena 
Davidson, Mary 
Smith, Vera 
Hardy, Vance 



Mallard, Marion 
Wilson, Fannie Lee 
Johnson, Alva 
Bishop, Dorothea 
Weeks, Agnes 
El rod, Laucile 
Blanks, Ruth 
Vinson, Maudelle 






PLEDGES : 



Alexander, Kathleen 
Barnes, Mae Lewis 
Brewer, Gladys 
Jennings, Lillian 



McKennon, Margaret 
McMahan, Verna 
Onderdonk, Ruth 
Tucker, Dixie 









8 3 

















hampda vhaptzp 

15=10 













84 







■ 



















Zeta Tau Alpha 



Founded in 1898. Farmsville, Va. 



COLORS: 



LAMBDA CHAPTER 






Installed 1906 


FLOWER: 




Steel Gray 


White Violet 




PATRONESS: 






Mrs. E. G. Gillett 







SORORES IN URBE: 

Lena Mae Nelms Mrs. Fisher 

SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Anna Laurie Bass 
Lila Bass 
Katherine Brown 
Hazel Davis 
Francis Gillett 



Inez Ayres 
Ruth Bryan 



Helen Gillett 
Ruth Glenn 
lone Irwin 
Kathleen McKnight 
Hattie Nelms 



Mary Dee Tanner 



PLEDGES: 



Ruth Parr 



Irene Lamb 
Christie Moore 






■\ 



86 





















Zefa SBT Cfapler 
























86 







Alpha Delta Pi 






CHAPTER ROLL 

ALPHA — Wesleyan Female College Macon, Ga. 

DELTA — University of Texas Austin, Tex. 

EPSILON — Newcomb College, Tulane University New Orleans, La. 

ZETA — Southwestern University Georgetown, Tex. 

THETA — Lawrence College Appleton, Wis. 

IOTA— State College for Women Tallahassee, Fla. 

KAPPA — Judson College Marion, Ala. 

LAMBDA Brenau College Conservatory Gainsville, Ga. 

MU — Woman's College of Alabama Montgomery, Ala. 

NU — Randolph-Macon Woman's College College Park, Va. 

OMICRON— Trinity College Durham, N. C. 

PI — Iowa State College Ames, la. 

RHO — Boston University Boston, Mass. 

SIGMA — University of Illinois Champaign, 111. 

TAU — University of Kansas Lawrence, Kan. 

UPSIEON— Washington State College Pullman, Wash. 

ZETA CHAPTER 
Established 1907 

COLORS: 
Blue and White 












FLOWER : 

Violet 

SORORES IN UNIVERS1TATE: 



Talley, Nellie 
Blount, Willie 
Hardeman, Gladys 
Mitchell, Alleene 
Nowlin, Gladys 
Nowlin, Mary 
Lloyd, Ruth 
Simmons, Etoy 



Davis, Louise 
Smith, Agnes 
Isom, Lorena 
Hightower, Rutli 
Goode, Mable 
Shands, Mable 
Shands, Lain 
Mullens, Mary 









87 













V 



CAMPBELL * , 

WATSON PAHTAIN 







COOK 



SHROCK 



ROTHChlLO 




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HK Chapter 

PHI MU 



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MB 



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88 






Phi Mu 

CHAPTER ROLL 

BETA, Hollins College 

DELTA, Newcomb College 

XI KAPPA, Southwestern University 

KAPPA, University of Tennessee 

LAM BDA, Randolph' M aeon College 

MU, Brenani College 

XI, University of New Mexico 

OM1CRON, Buchtel College 

PI, ...University of Maine 

RHO, Hanover College 

SIGMA, Knox College 

TAU, Whitman College 

UPSLLON, Ohio State University 

PHI, University of Texas 

CHI, University of Missouri 

PSI, Adelphi College 

EPSILON, Millsaps College 

IOTA, Lawrence College 

OMEGA, Iowa Wesleyan College 

BETA ALPHA, George Washington University 

IOTA SIGMA, University of California 

EPSLLON ALPHA, Southern Methodist University 

XI KAPPA CHAPTER 

FLOWER: 
Pink Carnation 

COLORS: 
Old Rose and White 

SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE : 

Pois Campbell Martha SchrocR 

Bernice Cooke Roberta Partain 

Nelia Frances Davidson Lulah Rothchild 

Mary Watson 

PLEDGES: 
Lillian Parr Mary Blaine 

Tom Hazle Dot Howard 

Ellen Hazle Milda Barton 

PATRONESSES 

Mrs. R. R. Banner Mis. Sam Atkins 

Mrs. W. F. Magee Mrs. John Hall 

Mrs. Elridge Hodges 






89 










PAN HELLENIC COUNCIL 



• to 






The Pan Hellenic Council 

REPRESENTATIVES 

DELTA DELTA DELTA 

Travis Cottrell Ruth Blanks 

ZETA TALI ALPHA 
Francis Gillett Hattie Nelms 

ALPHA DELTA PI 
Willie Blount Gladys Nowlin 

Pill MP 
Roberta Partain Lulah Rothchlld 

KAPPA ALPHA 
P. 11. Tucker W. A. Smith, Jr. 

PHI DELTA THETA 
E. G. Jenkins Archie Hoyl 

KAPPA SIGMA 
J. L. Spivey Harold Dayvault 






E. C. Clabaugrh J. C. Tucker 






PI KAPPA ALPHA 









9 1 



























92 










Religious Organizations 










93 








Ministerial Association 

OFFICERS 

D. A. Chisholm ...President 

E. H. Bode Vice President 

R. D. Biggs Secretary 



ROM; OF MEMBERS 



Bode, E. W. 
Ridgway, Tom 
DeVore, H. S. 
Dickehute, H. II. 
Dunnam, S. M. 
McNeil, L. C. 
Mauldin H. H. 
Haver, Stanley 
Nevil, William 
Slack, W. B. 
Lyons, J. L. 
McConn, E. D. 
Timmons, J. G. 
Francis, Fred 
Hardt, L. D. 
Hardt, Wesley 



Taylor, R. L. 
Shuptrine, George 
Harwell, J. G. 
Mason, J. J. 
Long, A. L. 
Raymer, K. H. 
G. E. Hutchings 
May, W. C. 
Smith, L. W. 
Parten, R. 0. 
Pitman, Verdie 
Hnckabee, E. 
Day, Walton 
Jonrdan, L. F. 
Dye, V. B. 
Hooten, C. R. 






94 

















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o 

EH 
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95 

























Y. M. C. A. CABINET 1915-1916 






96 













Young Men's Christian Association 

1915-1916 

CABINET 

Stanley Haver President 

Hugh S. Carter Vice President 

Archie Hoyl Secretary 

F. W. Birkman Treasurer 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 









J. L. Lyons Devotional 

W. A. Smith, Jr Bible Study 

C. B. Harbour Missions 

E. W. Bode Membership 

C. R. Hooten Social 

Henry Straw Publicity 

W. W. Jackson . Extension 

Dr. John C. Granbery Faculty Advisor 






97 




























Y. W. C. A. CABINET 1915-1916 



98 



Young Women's Christian Association 

1915-1916 



CABINET 









Ida Mae Lee President 

lone Irwin Vice President 

Bernice Cook Secretary 

Vera Smith Treasurer 



COMM I TTEE CH A IRM EN 

Kit tie Cain Devotional 

Hattie Stanford Bible Study 

Mary Davidson Mission Study 

Elizabeth Smyrl Social Service 

Hazel Davis Social 

Roweua Onderdonk Association News 

Hattie Nelms Alumni 

Fannie Lee Wilson Membership 

Ruth Goddard Publicity 

Tennie Mae Bass Finance 



ee 







Intercollegiate Prohibition League 










OFFICERS 

Harry S. DeVore President 

Hattie Stanford Vice President 

T. Lee, Jr Secretary-Treasurer 

Vera Smith Reporter 

ROLL 

Allen, Dilliar Lee, Lucy 

Baird, Eugenia Lee, T. Jr. 

Barnes, Mae Lewis Lemnion, Grace 

Blaine, Mary Limmer, A. M. 

Bass, Tennie Mae Oatman, Helen 

Black, A. P. Parr, Ruth 

Chisholm, D. A. Partain, R. 0. 

Clabaugh, E. C. Jr. May, W. C. 

Carter, H. S. Merrem, W. E. 

DeVore, H. S. Mitchell, T. Ms 

DeVilbis, Leta Miller, C. L. 

Goddard, Ruth McGhee, J. L. 

Grimes, Maggie McNeil, Clare 

Haygood, Aline Ridgway, Tom 

Hardeman Gladys Slagle, W. M. 

Hardt, Wesley Sessions, Gilpin S. 

Hardy, L. d'. Smith, C. V. 

Harbour, C. B. Smith, Vera 

Haver, Stanley Sparks, R. B. 

Hooten, C. R. Stanford, Hattie 

Hubbard, Mark Stindt, W. H. 

Howard, Dorothy Taylor, R, D. 

Irvin, lone Weimer, Marvin 

Keese, Selma Wilson, A. W. 

King, F. II. Willis, Claude 









100 













y»iUSICAl* 











10 1 












Southwestern University Glee Club 



OFFICERS 

Prof. Arthur L. Manchester Director 

C. R. Hooton Manager 

Frederick A. Manchester Pianist 



MEMBERS 



FIRST TENORS 
Archie Hoyl 
James Barcus 
C. I. Bounds 
C. R. Hooton 

FIRST BASSES 
A. Manchester 
C. L. Willis 
J. B. Cowan 
Paul Hightower 
L. H. Mitchell 



SECOND TENORS 
•John Gillett 
V. R. Means 
H S. DeVore 
S. R. Hay 
W. W. Simons 

SECOND BASSES 
W. H. Hull 
R Y. Seale 
H Ilardt 
J. L. V aught 
T. Lee 


















102 





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103 


















Southwestern University Orchestra 







Miss Etelka Evans Directot 



MEMBERS 



FIRST VIOLINS 
llallie Crutchiield 
Annie Laurie Bass 
Mattie Mills 
Wlma Tisdale 



SECOND VIOLINS 
Jane Johnson 
Steiner Booty 
Archie Hoyl 
Emory Campbell 






CORNET E. S. McLarty 

FLUTE Verna McMahan 

DRUM Curtis Walker 

PIANO Ruth Goddard 



1 04 







CLUBS 




For 

w 



faifl** 



POET'S CLUB 















105 













SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP SOCIETY 



1 Of, 






Southwestern University Scholarship Society 



FOUNDED IN 1914 



The purpose of this Society is the furtherance of scholarly attainments 
among the students of Southwestern University. 

Membership is limited to students in the Junior and Senior Classes of 
the Academic Department. A high scholastic standing is also prerequisite 
to admission. 



ROLL OF MEMBERS 



Dr. C. M. Bishop 
Dr. J. L. McGhee 
Dr. C. C. Cody 
Prof. R. J. Eddy 
A. N. Averyt 
George Pierce 
Julia McFaddin 
E. C. Clabaugh 
Lois Campbell 
Gillett Burns 



Gladys Nowlin 
Nellie Talley 
Inez Dunlap 
Cornelia Gayden 
Mary Ii'vine 
A. P. Black 
L. C. Merrem 
F. A. Manchester 
Frank Callcott 
Roberta Partain 
Annie Smith 





















107 






















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OFFICERS 






Roberta Partain President 

Marvin Weimers Vice President 

Lalu Shands Secretary 

J. L. Spivey Treasurer 



ROLL 



Ruth Bryan 
Mable Shands 
Vera Smith 
Ruth Goddard 
Lulah Rothschild 
Mary Lynn Walker 
Tennie Mae Bass 
Lilian Jennings 
Anne McClendon 
Annie Smith 
Travis Cottrell 
Annie L. Bass 
Ruth Story 
Mary Watson 
Angie Smith 
J. T. Leeson 
Everette Seale 

W. E. Merrem ] 

E. S. McLarty 



I,. D. Hardt 
W. H. Grote 
Ben Leigh 
A. P. Black 
F. A. Thompson 
A. B. Pari a in 
Gillett Burns 
M. Limmer 
Claude Willis 
Vance Jenkins 
L. C. Merrem 
Henry Straw 
W. W. Simons 
E. L. Alberson 
Arthur Burns 
R. L. Brewer 
R. Roy Jobson 
E. W. Bode 









109 









Southwestern Chemistry Society 







The purpose of his Society shall be to raise the standard of efficiency in 
the department of Chemistry and to bring together those who have done 
exceptional work in this department. 

OFFICERS 

A. P. Black President 

Nellie Talley Secretary 

ROLL 



(1) 


Cain Kittie 


(7) 


McLarty, E. S. 


(2) 


Birkman, Fred 


(8) 


Jenkins, Vance N 


(3) 


Spivey, J. L. 


(9) 


Foster, J. D. 


(4) 


Lee, Ida Mae 


(10) 


Nellie Talley 


(5) 


Black, A. P. Jr. 


(11) 


Burns, Gillett 


(6) 


McGhee, Prof. J. 


L. 


Averyt, A. N. Jr. 




Sk 


igle, W. M. 





1 io 










THE) BUTH CLUB 
















iffrdalonf cuneRatK 






1 1 1 






















FLORESVILLE CLUB 

Coughran, Joe, Seale, E., Seale, R., Mitchell, Coughran, S., Irwin 

McKenzie, Mitchell, Matlock, Irwin, McDaniel, Wilson 




CORONAL CLUB 

Chapman, Vaughn, Seale, Stindt, Biggs, Coughran, S., Forrester 
Merrem, Coughran, Joe, Marsh, Simons, Carter 












1 1 2 




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BELL COUNTY CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Mary Lynn Walker President F. A. Thomson Vice President 

Dorothea Howard ...Secretary-Treasurer 
ROLL 
Clabaugh, E. C. (4) Howard, Dorothea (7) 

Clabaugh, J. U. (6) Knickerbocker, H. R. (9) 

Cowsert, C. C. (14) Leigh, Ben (2) 

Erhardt, Edith Limmer, A. M. (8) 

Hardin, Lucile (5) McKnight, Kathleen (13) 

Harwell, W. H. (11) Means, V. R. (10) 






Richards, Rubidick (1) 
Schrock, Martha (15) 
Sealy, Anne (3) 
Tbomson, F. A. (16) 
Walker, Mary Lynn (12) 






1 1 4 




nmK TWREE 





lasses. 













1 15 



SENIOR CLASS 



FLOWER 

Link Killarney Rose 

COLORS 
Ruby and ( >I<1 Rose 

MOTTO 

AUv apicrreveiv Kai inreipoxov ep.p.eva.1 aXXcov. 

( )FFICBRS 

KALI; TERM 

Inez Dunlap President 

George P. Pierce Vice-President 

Lois Campbell Secretary 

WINTER TERM 

Fred Francis President 

E. G. Jenkins Vice-President 

liois Campbell Secretary 

SPRING TERM 

Roberta Partain President 

J. G. Burns Vice-President 

Gladys Nowlin Secretary 

HONOR COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES 

Mary Davidson Fred Francis 

C. F. Tucker Treasurer 

Hattie Stanford Senior Editor 



1 l « 










E. L. ALBERSON, A. B., Cherokee, Texas. 

"/ dare do all that may become a man who 
dare do more is none." 

"Dutch" is what might be called a "civil- 
ized" dutchman. He is thoroughly civilized, 
however, and not at all dangerous except in 
the presence of the fair sex. Since coming 
to Southwestern he has dropped his dutch 
and now speaks United States fluently. 

Being tall and stately he makes a digni- 
fied teacher at Prep and he may easily be 
mistaken for a real "prof." 



AARON HENRY ANGLIN, A. B., A. M., 
Georgetown, Texas. 

"Here's to an honest man — 
The noblest work of God." 

Barb; San Jacinto; Mission Band; Basket 
Ball '10; Foot Ball Scrubs '12; Foot Ball 
Squad '15-'16. 

He declares that it was six years ago that 
he landed at Southwestern. He has spent a 
year or two teaching since that time and re- 
turned to graduate with the '16 Class. 

In athletics he has gained a record worthy 
of note as well as in other activities. 



ARRIE BARRETT, A. B., Anson, Texas. 

"A lovable character- 
sincere." 



-entirely lovable and 



Alethean; Y. W. C. A. 

Arrie is one of our prodigals who returned 
to complete her course after some practical 
experience in the class room. 

She has distinguished herself this year by 
winning Prof. Moore's commendation "From 
time to time." 

FRED BISHOP, A. B., Georgetown, Texas. 

"The secret of success is a constancy to 
purpose." 

Whether purposely or otherwise Fred has 
held himself aloof from the members of the 
class. In fact during his Senior year he 
spent the greater part of his time in doing 
correspondence work. 

Although Fred's personal appearance is 
nothing out of the ordinary; in fact it might 
be termed ordinary, still when one enters 
into conversation with him one is startled 
by his wide scope of knowledge — especially 
in the field of agriculture (please note dis- 
tinction between field of agriculture and ag- 
ricultural field). As regards "Farmers' Un- 
ions" he is the last authority, 










1 17 













LESLIE A. BOONE, A. B., Corpus Christi, 
Texas. 

"The light that never was on sea or land. 
The consecration and the poet's dream." 
Kappa Sigma; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '14-'15; 
Alamo Intermediate Debate '14-'15; Mega- 
phone Staff Poet '14-'15; President Junior 
Class '14-'15; Glee Club '14-'15; Art Edtior 
'14-'15; Junior Orator '14-'15; Chairman 
Lecture Committee '15-'16; Editor South- 
western University Magazine '15-'16; Press 
Club. 

If there were a fourth dimension for the 
Seniors to aspire to, Leslie is the only one 
in the class who would qualify. He does not 
mix with the "Common Herd", but 
dwells apart in realms of rhythm, rhyme 
and — Ruth. 

J. G. BURNS, A. B., Cuero, Texas. 

"In calmness made." 

Phi Delta Theta; Chemistry Society; 
Scholarship Society. 

Everyone tho't Gillett was quiet, re- 
served and adverse to society until he made 
his debut as Campaign Manager for the pop- 
ularity contest. 

KITTIE CAIN, A. B„ Elgin. Texas. 

"Her air, her manners, all who saw admired ; 
Courteous, though coy and gentle, though 
retired." 

Delta Delta Delta; Fitting School 
Scholarship '12; Woman's Honor Council '13- 
'14; Secretary of Junior Class '15; Member 
of Chemistry Club '14-'15; Y. W. C. A. Cabi- 
net '14-'15, '15-'16; President of Woman's 
Self Government Association '14-'15. 

The years she has spent at Southwestern 
have been filled with her class work, re- 
sponsible activities and helping other people. 

"Princess Kittie" wil' continue to be as 
unassuming as she is regardless of the hon- 
ors she receives. 

FRANK CALLCOTT, A. B., Sabinal, Texas. 

"Fie upon this single life." 

Barb; San Jacinto; President San Jacinto 
15-'lfi; President Epworth League '15-'16: 
Mission Band '15-'16; Student Instructor in 
Spanish; Scholarship Society; San Jacinto 
Intermediate Debate '14-'15-'16; Junior Or- 
ator '14-*15. 

"Mr. Callcott" has been a leader in religious 
circles ever since he landed at South western. 
He is president of the Mission Band and one 
of the mainstays of the Ministerial Associa- 
tion. He is also a member of the "Lead 
Kindly Light Society" — Otherwise he is a 
very respectable citizen. 












1 18 









LUIS CAMPBELL, A. B., Georgetown, Texas. 

".1 little upright, pert, tart, tripping wright. 
This little maid is our delight." 

i'ai Mu; Orchestra '12 to 15; Secretary 
.... iiior Class; Scholarship Society '15-'16. 

"Snookums" is said to be a very studious 
.a, but there seems to be some doubt 
about it, as she declares that she never misses 
a show. At any rate, she has accomplished 
the feat of belonging to the Scholarship So- 
ciety. 

NELLIE CARR, Rusk, Texas. 

"Oli blessed with the power to make to- 
morrow as bright as today." 

Student Instructor of Latin 15-'16. 

"Nellie" is one of our class who has made 
a four years course in three with an average 
hard to excell. 

She is sincere and true to her friends and 
wherever she goes she will be successful. 

HUGH SEVIER CARTER, A. B., George- 
town, Texas. 

"Though modest, on his unembarrassed 
brow nature had written 'gentleman'." 

Kappa Sigma; San Jacinto; Magazine 
Staff '13-'14; Megaphone Staff '13-'14; Sou' 
wester Staff '14-'15; Alternate Intercollegiate 
Debate '14-'] 5: Junior Orator '14-'15; Mar- 
shall '14-'15; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '15-'16; 
Editor-in-Chief of the Sou'wester '15-'16; Chief 
Marshall '15-'16; Manager Basket Ball '15 
'16; President San Jacinto '15-'16; President 
Press Club '15-'16. 

Owing to the natural reserve and inherent 
dignity of "Sir Roger" we hesitate to roast 
"Honey Boy" (the appellation of Senior girl). 

It has been known all the year that he was 
the National board of censorship for the 
Sou'wester, but only recently it has become 
known that he has been so "bored" with 
part of it that he turned it down. 

In spite of his modest mien many honors 
have been "thrust upon him." 

LUCILE CHAPMAN, A. B., Leander, Texas. 

"A truer, nobler, trustier heart, more lov- 
ing or more loved ne'er beat within a human 
breast." 

Clio; Honor Council of Woman's Self Gov- 
ernment Asociation '14-'15; Lecture Commit- 
tee '15-'16. 

"Little 'un" spent a year or two at Coronal 
and then came to Southwestern to take her 
degree. 

Every term she has been here she has 
fully intended to fail in one course at least 
but somehow she has been disappointed in 
this and instead she usually ranks high. 







1 1 9 







»!■ 




E.C. CLABAUGH, JR., A. B., Belton, Texas. 
"Looks forward persevering to the last, 
From well to better, daily self-surpassed." 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Alamo; President Pan- 
Hellenic '15-'16; Intermediate Debate 14- 
'15 Baylor Debate '15-'16; President 
Honor Council '15-'16; Vice-President Alamo 
14-15; Magazine Staff 13-14; Southwestern 
University Scholarship Society '15-16; 
Marshall 15-16. 

In his Freshman days Clabaugh aspired to 
be a lover and this aspiration reached its 
culmination in his Junior year. While in 
his Senior year he became more serious and 
for some unaccountable reason the Annex 
knew him no longer. 

STANLEY COUGHRAN, A. B., Floresville, 
Texas. 
"Worldly ivise, exceeding clever, 

Of a graciousness inate; 
And in every role whatever 
'Up-to-date'." 
Kappa Sigma; Alamo; Alamo President 
15-16; Assistant Manager Base Ball 14-15 
Pal is one of the most all 'round men in 
the class. Although he walks with the air 
of one "en haut" few social gatherings are not 
cheered with his wit, humor and general 
pleasantness. 

JOHN B. COWAN, A. B., Lampasas, Texas. 

"A very thoughtful student — careful not 
to overdo it." 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Glee Club 13-14-15-16; 
T. B. of B. P. Club. 

in earlier days "Johnnie" learned to solve 
the problem of maximum efficiency with 
minimum mid-night oil consumption. 

He also made himself famous by his su- 
perior loyalty to the Annex and we have 
even heard that his fickle heart is like a 
Columbia boarding house — there's always 
room for one more. 



GEO. E. DARSEY, JR., Grapeland, Texas. 

"Take him all in all we shall never see 
his like again." 

"Sawbones" is the only one of his kind in 
captivity. He was one of the contestants in 
the Ugliest Man contest, but unfortunately 
was defeated. As organizer, ramrod and 
general business manager of the various 
Hard Nine Organizations he has placed stars 
in his crown. 

In Sociology he is adviser to Dr. Gran- 
berry and has the gift of shaking his head 
when the wrong answer is given. 



l 20 






MARY DAVIDSON, A. B., Monticello, Ark. 
"Who scatters around wit and humor at will; 
Whose daily 'bon mots' half a. column might 
fill." 

Delta Delta Delta; University Honor Coun- 
cil; Woman's Honor Council; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet. 

Although she came from "Arkansas" one 
would never know it. 

It was in the fall of 1915 that Mary land- 
ed at Southwestern and now we are convinc- 
ed she is "in love" with Texas. 

Since she starred in "Breezy Point" as 
Ashrael and in Public Speaking Class Mary 
has about decided to go on the stage. This 
is to be seen later. 

NELIA FRANCES DAVIDSON, A. B., Flores- 

ville, Texas. 

"Life is so short and love is all, I'm think- 
ing:' 

Phi Mu. 

To a stranger Nelia is a very quiet, sober, 
dignified maiden; to those who know her 
this is the very much on the surface. 
Nelia has a poetical soul, doting on 
"Poems of Pasion" and "Love Sonnets." 
Each year she has a new love affair and 
every time it threatens to be "Something 
really serious, My Dear"; however, those 
acquainted with her wiles know that — "It's 
just a fancy of the skitish mind of youth." 
that comes and goes with the spring." 

HAROLD DAYVAULT, Blessing, Texas. 

He frowns and looks wise when he thinks 
the professor is going to ask him a question. 

Kappa Sigma; Member Mood Hall Honor 
Council '14-'15; Assistant Business Manager 
of Sou'wester '14-'15; Business Manager of 
Megaphone '15-'16; Pan Hellenic '15-'16. 

"Child Harold" has distinguished himself 
by his dry wit and good disposition. 

"Du" has taken an active part in college 
and no doubt he will be a great business man 
but we will tip our hats to him who has ac- 
complished the feat of graduating without 
the use of textbooks. 

INEZ DUNLAP, A. B., Hereford, Texas. 

"Her character is moulded from the three 
words: happiness, content and good will." 

Delta Delta Delta; Alethean; President 
Alethean '16; Basket Ball '12-'13-'14-'15-'16; 
Captain Basket Ball '15; Manager Basket 
Ball '16; Editor Junior Class; President of 
Senior Class '15; Student Instructor in Ger- 
man '14-'15; Student Instructor in English 
'15-'16; Scholarship Society. 

The first year Ienz entered upon her col- 
lege career she made a record in the class 
room and Basket Ball which she has kept. 
She is indeed one of our athletes and we are 
always sure of her plays. 







\ 'A 1 

























MARY DUNLAP, Voice, Hereford, Texas. 

-Her voice changed like a bird's; 
There grew more of the music and less of 

of the words." 

Delta Delta Delta: Basket Ball, 12-'13- 
•14-'15. 

Mary is a girl with a smile. If her eyes 
only were visible you would know she was 
smiling. If you could see nothing but her 
mouth you would still realize that she was 
smiling. Tho she has been absent since 
Christmas, she still lives in the hearts of 
her classmates thru her charming personal- 
ity. 



LEE E. EDENS, A. B., Bertram, Texas. 

"Who never knew misfortune and most 
heartily did laugh." 

San Jacinto; President of San Jacinto Lit- 
erary Society, '16. 

As the evening shadows were falling one 
September eve four years ago, the entire 
population of Bertram (23) gathered around 
the little station to see their fairest son 
take his departure for College. Since that 
time "Lee" has acquired the knowledge of 
"vaporizing" for the Education Classes and 
giving science reports. 

FRED FRANCIS, A. B., Lampasas, Texas. 

"My mind to me a kingdom is." 

Alamo; Pres. Senior Class, '15-'16; Brooks 
Prize Debate *15-'16; Pres. Alamo Literary 
Society, '15-'16. 

Fred is a social possibility without the in- 
clination and also an unknown quantity not 
s abject to chemical analysis. 

On warm Spring days he prefers to follow 
the teachings of Isaac Walton rather than 
Pegues, Davidson and Granbery. 

Reward offered to find out the cause of 
the social awakening. 

CORNELIA GAYDEN, Groesbeck, Texas. 

She has found a work, a life purpose; 
and she will follow it cheerfully. 

Graduate Scarritt Bible and Training 
School 1915. 

Member Southwestern University Scholar- 
ship Society. 

Cornelia came to us from Scarritt Bible 
and Training School. In future years we 
will be especially glad to hear the name of 
one of our class mates among those who are 
achieving great success in another land. 

She has been faithful to every task — but 
once she did cut her "prep" class to attend 
Senior meeting! 









1 2 U 



R. B. GILBREATH, A. B., Columbia, Ten- 
nessee. 

"Whense is thy learning:' Has thy toil 
o'er books consumed the mid-night oil:"' 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Alamo; Intermediate De- 
bate, '14-'15; Student Instructor in Science; 
Pres. Alamo, '15-'16. 

A foreigner — from Tennessee. "Bob" must 
have been the man who invented work. He 
is always at the bottom of the deepest pro- 
blems. 

IRENE SHANNON HENDERSON, A. B., 

Georgetown, Texas. 

"Makes you look into the future and ask 
yourself, what destiny will be hers." 

Student Assistant in English. Member 
Southwestern University Scholarship So- 
ciety. 

When she was a Freshman Miss Sanders 
often drilled her in walking on the balls of 
her feet and in lowering her voice but since 
then Irene has "fallen from grace" and we 
wonder if there is any hope for her. 

A. G. HOYL, A. B., Decatur, Texas. 

"Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit; 
For 'tis a throne where honor may be 

crowned 
Sole monarch of the Universal earth." 

Phi Delta Theta; Alamo; Intermediate 
debate '14-'15; Orchestra; Secretary Y. M. C. 
A. Basket Ball '13-'14; Track '13-'14; Foot 
Ball '14-'15, 15-'16; Glee Club '15-'16; Pan 
Hellenic. 

For four years Archie has done nothing 
but play. 

As a Freshman he began to play track 
and won the hurdles. As a Sophomore and 
Junior he strengthened the Foot Ball and 
Basket Ball teams. In the latter part of his 
College career, however, his aesthetic nature 
got the mastery and he became a mainstay 
of the Orchestra and sole rival of the stray 
cats around Mood Hall. 

WARREN H. HULL, A. B., A. M., San An- 
tonio, Texas. 

"The soul reveals itself in the voice only." 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Glee Club '12-'13-'14-'15- 
'16. Student Assistant in Biology '13-'14 
Manager Glee Club '14-'15. 

Futuregraph "from the New York Times 
1926." 

"Never in history has an artist been so 
enthusiastically received as was Monsieur 
Warren H. Hull. 

He received his earliest training in 
Southwestern University Choir, Georgetown, 
Texas. It was here, that he acquired his 
remarkable wind." 




. 



123 










MARY J. IRVINE, A. B., Georgetown, Texas. 

S7ie hath a will of her own and can take 
care of herself. 

Mary has made herself known best to those 
in her section at Chapel. Between her con- 
scientiousness and Prof. Tinsley's threats 
"Pew 31" is always crowded. 

Mary is thorough in all her work and has 
won much admiration. 



W. W. JACKSON, A. B., Mansfield, Texas. 

"Who, if he rise to station of command, 
Rises by open means." 

Barb; San Jacinto; Intermediate Debate, 
13-'14; Magazine Staff, '14-15; San Jacinto- 
Rusk Debate, '14-'15; Brooks Prize Debate, 
'14-'15; Pres. San Jacinto, '15-'16; Baylor 
Debate 15-'16; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '15-*16. 

"Winsome Willie" should have his picture 
made in full dress suit in his Freshman 
year — some of the girls have decided he is 
good looking (in his picture). 

He has been one of our debators and, in 
fact, he has taken part in many of the best 
things in college. 

E. G. JENKINS, A. B., Bryan, Texas. 
"It is not position but mind I want." 

Phi Delta Theta; Assistant Manager in 
Track '14-'15; Vice-President Senior Class; 
Pan Hellenic Council '15-'16. 

"Jenks" made his debut into the Senior 
Class when he assumed the office of vice- 
president. Since then he has been a loyal 
Senior. 

For four years "Jenks" has continued to 
win friends on account of his good disposi- 
tion and pleasant smile, which never wears 
off. 

When he has become a prominent physi- 
cian we will be even prouder of him. 



IDA MAE LEE, A. B„ Bastrop, Texas. 

"Her judgement good, her ways concise; 
she goes it all alone. She listens to her 
friends advice, then goes and takes Tier 
own." 

Clio; Clio President '14-'15; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet '14-T5; Y. W. C. A. President '15-'16 
Lecture Committee 'lb-'16; Honor Council of 
Woman's Self Government Association '14-'15. 

Ida Mae has always been known for her 
ability to catch a joke readily (?) She "got 
by" on her brother's reputation during her 
Freshman year but her record for the re- 
maining years may be read in her "honors". 












1 24 



BEN LEIGH, A. B. Temple, Texas. 

"He's a philosopher; nothing disquiets 
him, nothing dismays." 

Alamo; Inter-Collegiate Debate '15-16; 
Senior Intermediate Debate '14-'15; Pres- 
ident of Junior Class '15. 

Words cannot describe Ben. To understand 
him fully one must see him and study him, 
and when one leaves him he is none the 
wiser. 

Ben's favorite pastime is the reviewing 
of old text-books and with the lore found 
therein he breaks up many a new-fangled 
theory. Naturally of an inquisitive mind 
he asks more questions and gets fewer ans- 
wers than any man in College, Prof. Dav- 
idson not excepted. 

J. L. LYONS, A. M., Glade Springs, Virginia. 

"A man is the architect of his fortune and 
he has already draughed the plans for his 
air castles." 

Kappa Alpha; Alamo; President Alamo, 
'14-'15; Mood Hall Honor Council, '14-'15; 
Brooks Prize Debate, '13-'14; President Pro- 
hibition League, '14-'15; Manager "Senior 
Daily," '14-'15; Prep Instructor, '15-'16; Pres- 
ident Of Students' Association, '15-'16. 

Virginia, has the honor of being the native 
state of this senior. 

He is reported to have said that he came 
all way down here to escape "Sleepy" but 
he was the first man he met when he arriv- 
ed at Southwestern. In spite of this fact 
he has repeatedly made distinction in 
history. 

FREDERICK ARTHUR MANCHESTER. A. 

B., Georgetown, Texas 

"7 may not he handsome but I'm darn 
good looking." 

Kappa Sigma; Alamo; Southwestern Uni 
versity Scholarship Society; Der Verein; 
Glee Club '14-'15; Pianist '15-'16. 

"Frederick" plays the piano for the Glee 
Club and the dickens everywhere else. 

In spite of the fact that he spends half 
his time in class using the well known blue 
pad and pencil he somehow manages to make 
distinctions in his courses. By virtue of 
this he belongs to the Scholarship Society. 

SUDIE MARTIN, A. B., Georgetown, Texas. 

"Nothing is impossible to diligence and 
skill" 

Sudie has been an unloyal Senior because 
she "cut" our class meeting to have a date 
but we still claim her as one of our num- 
ber and perhaps there is some hope for her 
conversion. 




1 2 5 























ANNIE McCLENDON, A. B., Ben Arnold 
Texas. 

"So firm, so strong, yet so refined." 

Clio; Honor Council of Woman's Self Gov- 
ernment Association \15-'16; Commencement 
President of Clio '16. 

Annie hails from Ben Arnold (search the 
map) and she declares its a great place. 

For four years she has looked forward to 
the time when she could get her a school 
and teach History — and now her aim is be- 
coming realized. 

"Dutchess Ann" has made a record during 
her college course that is worthy and she 
will make her future a success. 

L. C. MERREM, A. B.. Shiner, Texas. 

"With all the requisites for a successful 
man — success will have to hustle to keep 
away from him." 

San Jacinto; Freshman-Sophomore Decla- 
mation Contest, '12-'13; Intermediate Orator, 
'13'14; Intermediate Debate, '14-'15; Junior 
Orator '14-'15; Student Assistant '15-16: 
Student Instructor, '15-'16; Brooks Prize 
Debate, '15-'16: Intercollegiate Orator, '15-'16. 

L. C. has been so busy developing his or- 
atorical powers since he has been at South- 
western that he has had no time nor in- 
clination to help wear smooth some of 
the rocks on the Annex walk. 

EDNA ALLENE MITCHELL, A. B., Flores- 

ville, Texas. 

••Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may 
roll. 

Charms strike the sight, but merit wins 
the soul." 

Alpha Delta Pi. After spending a year at 
S. A. F. C. "Mitch" came to Southwestern to 
finish her "education." 

Her reputation was made for her when 
she arrived because she happened to be one 
of the Floresville aggregation. 

"Mitch" is not very much interested in 
school teaching, she thinks she knows of 
something far more pleasant! 

GLADYS MARGARET NOWLIN, A. B., 

Georgetown, Texas. 

With a light heart, gay and free. 

A. D. Pi, Student Assistant in French '14- 
'15; Southwestern Scholarship Society. 

Gladys has shown her loyalty to the '16 
Class by coming to one of its parties, at 
least. 

In other ways she has been more loyal. 
She has helped to raise the standard through 
her high scholarship and we are justly proud 
of her. 









1 2 6 






ROWENA ONDERDONK, A. B., San Anto- 
nio, Texas. 

"As lamps burn silent with unconscious 
light, 

So modest ease in beauty shines most 
bright." 

Delta Delta Delta; Alethean; President 
Alethean; Basket Ball Team '12-'13, Captain 
Basket Ball Team '13-'14; Manager Basket 
Ball Team '14-'15; Captain Basket Ball Team 
'15-16; Vice-Pres. Athletic Ass'n; Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet '15-'16; Sou'Wester Staff '15-'16; 
Student Instructor in Spanish '14-'15. 

"Billy" was rather shy in her Freshman 
days — in fact some thought she was a man- 
hater but how swiftly opinions change! 

It was thought that she was only an 
athlete but she has taken an interest and 
participated in other activities. 

In her Senior year "Billie" was elected 
as our May Queen. 

ROBERTA PARTAIN, A. B., Georgetown, 
Texas. 

"None knew her but to love her. 

None named her but to praise." 

Phi Mu; Student Assistant in German, '14- 
'15; Student Instructor in French, '14-'15; 
University Honor Council, '14-'15; Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council, '14-'15; Pres. German Society, 
'15-'16; Pres. Senior Class, '15-'16; Editor-in- 
Chief Senior '15-'16. 

Among many things she excells in, languages 
are pre-eminent and should German become 
the universal language, Roberta, would have 
no need to be embarassed. 

RUTH PIPER, A. B., Georgetown, Texas. 

My creed is, he is safe who does Ms best." 

Scholarship Society. 

Ruth is one of our class who reminds her- 
self to keep away from Senior social func- 
tions. 

Her record in the class room has been 
among the best and with her ability she will 
be a successful teacher in years to come. 

MORGAN HAMPTON RICE, A. B., Moody, 

Texas. 

"Good natured with a smile that laps over 
twice and buttons behind." 

Barb; San Jacinto; Y. M. C. A. 

He belongs to the press club as all through 
college his long suit has been to press suits. 
Now several boys are threatening to bring 
"breach-of-promise suits" to him but he 
pays no attention to this rumor. We are 
told that (Mr. Rice) is a hard working young 
man. 










1 27 










RUBIDICK RICHARD, A. B., Temple, Texas. 

"Of temper sweet, of yielding will 
Of firm, yet placid mind." 

Member of Clio Literary Society; Y. W. 
C. A. 

Rubidick was known in her Freshman year 
by her little feet and after four years her 
reputation remains the same. 

"Her feet beneath her petticoat like little 
mice stole in and out." 

The smallness of her statue does not pre- 
vent her heart from being large and her 
brain active. 



ROY E. SEALE, A. B.. Floresville, Texas. 
-Not a man of iron but of live oak." 

Kappa Sigma. San Jacinto Literary So- 
ciety; Assistant Track Manager '14-'15; 
Track Manager 15-'16. Gesellschaft; Verein. 

There are moments in the lives of all great 
men in which the future opens as a door 
and reveals to them a glimpse of their life's 
purpose. Such a moment must have oc- 
curred to Roy when he left "Floresville" 
four years ago. In track and pole vaulting 
Roy has excelled as well as in other lines 
of work. 

He has won friends through his good 
humor and pleasant disposition. 



ANNA BELL SEALY, A. B., Temple, Texas. 
"Quietude and kindness on all occasions." 

Clio; Y. W. C. A. 

If silence is golden Anna's fortune is made 
for she is a firm believer in the conserva- 
tion of words. In fact she says so little 
that we do not know much about her. 



RUTH SIMMONS, A. B., Lampasas, Texas. 

"And those about her shall read the perfect 
nays of honor." 

Woman's Honor Council '15-'l(j. Clio; 
Student Assistant in Chemistry Fall Term 
'15. 

She didn't know where her talent was 
until she passed in Sophomore English, then 
she decided to peruse Literature. 

She has been one of the faithful members 
of the Honor Council and she is always 
ready for hard tasks because she has the 
perseverance. 






1 -A.H 









H. G. SIMPSON, A. B., Colorado, Texas. 
"One honor won is surely for more" 
Barb; Alamo; Marshall, '13-'14; Magazine 
Staff, '13-'14; Alamo President, '13-'14; Lec- 
ture Committee, '14-'15; Business Manager 
Magazine, '14-'15; Student Assistant in Phy- 
sics, '14-'15. 

Homer has been in school four years but 
he declares that the Summer School '15 was 
the happiest period of his life. He aspires 
to be a civil engineer and we except him 1o 
be as successful there as he has been in his 
college course. 

W. M. SLAGLE, A. B., Troup, Texas, 

"A hard working, industrious, God fear- 
ing man." 

Barb; Alamo; Student Instructor in Math- 
ematics '13-'44; President Alamo '16; 
Assistant Editor Senior Daily '16; Chemistry 
Club. 

It has been suggested that if the Lord 
smiled when he made some people he must 
have laughed aloud when he made this one. 
Although good looks are not a foremost 
characteristic he has many stalwart quali- 
ties. 

"Slag" is one of the industrious hard 
working members of our class. At present 
he is a member of the Senior Staff and feels 
deeply the weight of the responsibility. 

CAROL SMITH, A. B., Humble, Texas. 

"Her voice was ever soft, gentle and low. 
An excellent thing in woman." 

"Pug" is an old settler who goes to school 
at intervals. She has been fortunate enough 
to have Senior privileges for two years — the 
main reason for this was to be able to be a 
member of the '16 Class. 

During her college career Puggie has had 
varied experiences. At present she is deal- 
ing in two important things — getting special 
delivery letters on Sunday and training her 
voice. She says she is going to teach next 
year but some wonder if she will not take 
another and more important degree. 

VERA SMITH, A. B., Sagerton, Texas. 

"It seemed that from her very presence 
sunshine streamed." 

Delta Delta Delta; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; 
Tennis Club; Clio Literary Society; I. P. 
A. Cabinet; Die Verein. 

Vera was known when she reached George- 
town as Mildred's sister. 

Vera is still young and as she goes out into 
greater fields of activities perhaps she will 
learn: 

"There's a gift beyond the reach of art, 
of being eloquently silent." 










l 29 


























J. L. SPIVEY, A. B., Bellevue, Texas. 

"Ripe for great exploits and mighty under- 
takings." 

Kappa Sigma; Alamo; Sou'Wester Staff 
'13-'14; Executive Committee of Students As- 
sociation '14-'15; Mood Hall Self-Government 
Association '14-'15; Marshall '15-'16; Pan- 
Hellenic Council '15-'16; Der Verein; Secre- 
tary Sunaay School '14-'15, '15-'16; Vice- 
president of Students Association '15-'16. 

hi spite of his statue "Jeff" has won a 
warm place in every heart. He has filled 
responsible offices during his college career 
and we predict a prosperous future for him, 
and — ,»erhaps he will grow. 

ANNIE SMITH, A. B., Merkle, Texas. 
"A happy genius is a gift of Nature." 
Quiet and unassuming though she is, An- 
nie ranks high in College. As proof of this 
she has been elected to membership in the 
Scholarship Society. 

As a Society butterfly she hasn't flutter- 
ed enough to alarm the authorities at the 
present writing, but in spite of this serious 
handicap we can confidently predict success 
for her. 

ELIZABETH A. SMYRL, A. B., El Paso. 

Texas. 

"She hath a wisdom that doth guide her 
valor to act in safety." 

Clio; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '15- - 16; President 
Young Woman's Honor Council 15-'16; 
Student Instructor in Spanish in Fitting 
School, '15-'16; Spanish Club '13-'14. 

"Smyrl" has tried several governments — 
Ireland, Mexico, United States, etc., but she 
says she likes self-government best. 

True Irish wit has been one of her re- 
deeming features for four years, even in her 
Senior year she can hardly assume a digni- 
fied air except as president of the Honor 
Council. 

HATTIE STANFORD, A. B., Lorena, Texas. 

"She is as kind as she is fair. 

For beauty lives with kindness". 

Clio; Vice-President Clio '13-'14; President 
Clio '15-'16; Woman's Self Government Of- 
ficer '14-15, '15-'16; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '14- 
15; '15-'16; Vice-President I. P. A. T5-'lfi; 
Senior Class Reporter. 

Hat has spent all of her leisure time and 
patience "putting back entrance credits." We 
have only to look above to remember how 
ready she has been to do her part. She is 
ready "To warn, to comfort and command" 
and those who do without her next year will 
realize that, "none but herself can he her 
parallel" 



1 30 










J. C. TUCKER, A. B., Garland Texas. 

"He touches the springs of finance for 
the class and at the end a stream of chicken 
feed flows forth." 

Pi KA; Alamo; Secretary of Sunday School 
'14- , 15; 15-'16; Pan Hellenic Council '15-'16: 
Treasurer of Senior Class; Student Assistant 
Zoology '14-'15, '15-'lfi. 

"Tuck" has found his calling — calling at 
the Annex. He is as faithful in this as he 
is in collecting Senior dues — although we 
admit that the latter may be far more pleas- 
ant. 

He had slight propensity for studying until 
he entered the English 7 class when like 
true greatness, it was thrust upon him. 

RUTH STORY. A. B., Plainview, Texas. 

"Straight for her is the path of duty 
And she always marked it a path of beauty." 

Clio; Y. W. C. A.; Senior Staff; Press 
Club; Student Assistant in History. 

A Clarendon graduate and a school 
teacher! 

Ruth has spent only one year at South- 
western and during that time she has be- 
come one of Prof. Moore's star pupils — she 
always knows when to laugh and how much. 

She is one of those care-free girls who 
make life worth while. 

F. H. TUCKER, A. B., Nacogdoches, Texas. 

Can he seen at a glance — think this over. 

KA; Mood Hall Honor Council, '13-'14, '14- 
'15; Assistant Manager Track, '14-'15; Assist- 
ant Business Manager Megaphone, '14-'15; 
President University Honor Council, '14-'15; 
Student Assistant in Chemistry, '13-'14, '14- 
'15; Pan-Hellenic Council, '14-'15; Manager 
Track, 14-'15. 

You wouldn't suspect it but they say he 
sneaks off and goes calling every Sunday 
night. 

"Pink" expects to be a surgeon and 
if he continues to be as persistant in his 
work as he has been in the laboratories he 
will be quite successful. 

MARVIN WIEMERS, A. B., Mason, Texas. 
"My son. beware of the Germans." 
Basket Ball, '14-'15; Foot Ball, '14-'15; San 
Jacinto, Verein. 

Marvin has several manias but the chief 
one is "Germania" One of his other manias 
is athletics. At foot ball he was always in 
there with the old ginger and fight and in 
Basket Ball he was a sure and dependable 
man. 







1 3 1 



Branches: 



Burns Literary 
Smith Captain 
Campbee Governor 
Anglin Fisherman 
Francis Kings 
Carter Black Ink 

Native Home: 



Mistletoe: 



Allene Mitchel 
Edmond Clabaugh 
Rowena Onderdonk 
Gladys Nowlin 
J. C. Tucker 



Garden of Eden(s) 



Leaves: 



Manchester 
Davidson 
Richards 
Wilson 







A. WARD WILSON, A. B., Floresville, Texas. 

"He in perfectly witty, his ways are im- 
mense, he'd tickle your fancy in spite of 
your ften.se." 

Barb; Alamo; Pres. Oratorical Associa- 
tion; Intercollegiate Debate, '14-'15; Brooks 
Prize Debate, *15-'16; Manager of Sou-Wester, 
15-'16. 

"Loopey" has become famous in S. U. 
circles as a debater and orator. So profi- 
cient has he become in the art that he can 
often conceal the absence of thought by a 
superfluity of words. He has distinguished 
himself in various ways while in college. 
As a Freshman he was noted for his green- 
ness; as a Soph — an organizer of Kangaroo 
Courts and various other dangerous enter- 
prises; as a Junior — a silver tongued orator; 
as a Senior, ramrod of the University and 
promoter of Beauty Contests. 















THE 
FAMILY TREE 






Name: Cain Trunk: Hull 
Color: Brown Use: Seale 






1 3 -J 






AWbe 



Strntrtons 




i 

Vera 

5lKdl * DCClflfENTS »eGm- 

/AT 




/?p*A>ena 




KoberHk 





jRnkiditK 








€7 




SC^KiJg 






1 33 










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Fred (Tfark* 




Iwihi — p— 




fe'TS 



/-^ r Hud- , v T.Omnurl 






134 



JUNIORS. 




iNCORATOR OF 

KHowceoce 







135 










JUNIOR CLASS 



OFFICERS 

FALL TERM 

Ben Leigh President 

Travis Cottrell Vice-President 

Eugene Perrin Secretary-Treasurer 

WINTER TERM 

Theopholus Lee, Jr President 

C. R. Hooten Vice-President 

Mary Watson Secretary-Treasurer 

SPRING TERM 

Hazel Davis President 

Claude Willis Vice-President 

Travis Cottrell <. Secretary-Treasurer 



HONOR COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES 
Mary Watson Eugene Perrin 









1 36 







JAMES E. ARMSTRONG, Georgetown. 
Pi KA. 

TENNIE MAE BASS, Yoakum. 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '14-'15; Woman's Self-Government Association, '15-'16; Sou'- 
wester Staff, '15-'16; President Alethean Literary Society. Fall Term, '15-'16. 

JAMES R. BARCUS, Hillsboro. 

KA; Alamo: Glee Club, *15-'16. 

FRED W. BIRKMAN, Shiner. 

San Jacinto; Student Assistant in English '15-'16; Manager Magazine, '15-'16; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet, '15-'16; Lecture Committee, '15-16; Marshal. 

BERNICE COOKE, Granger. 

Phi Mu; Alethean; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 

E. H. BISHOP, Georgetown. 
KS. 










137 



















A. P. BLACK, JR., Blossom. 

Scholarship Society, '15-'16; Chemistry Club, '14-'15, '15-'16; Student Assistant in 

Chemistry, '15-'16; Mood Hall Honor Council, '15-'lfi. 
BRVIN W. BODE, Oastell. 

Barb; Prep. Glee Club, '9-'10; Declamation, '9; San Jacinto; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 

'12, '15;- Ministerial Association; Track Team, '12-'13; Football Team, '12, '15; 

University Glee Club, '15-'16. 
TRAVIS COTTRELL. Piano. 

Delta Delta Delta; Vice-President Sophomore Class. '14-'15; Vice-President Junior 

Class, '15-'16; Alethean; Pan-Hellenic, '15-'lfi: Associate Editor Magazine, '15-'16; 

Assistant Editor Megaphone '15,-'16; Instructor at Prep., '15-'16. 
HAZEL DAVIS, Corsicana. 

ZTA; Clio; Self-Government, '15-'16; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '15-'16; President Junior 

Class, '15-'16. 
HARRY S. EDGE. Bryan. 

San Jacinto. 
J. D. FOSTER, China Springs. 

Pi KA; Scrub Foot Bali, '14-'15. 







1 38 








vrbotf 



WESLEY H. GROTE, Castell. 

San Jacinto; Foot Ball Squad, '15-'16. 

LUCILE ELROD, Timpson. 

Delta Delta Delta; Honor Council, '14-'15; Megaphone Staff, '15-'16; Prep. Faculty, 
'15-'16. 

CLIFFORD B. HARBOUR, Piedmont, Ala. 

Barb; San Jacinto; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '15-'16; Intermediate Debate, '15-'16; Vice- 
President San Jacinto, '15-'16. 

FRANCIS GILLETT, Georgetown. 

ZTA; Pan-Hellenic, - 13- , 14, '14- , 15, '15-'16. 

STANLEY HAVER, Houston. 

San Jacinto; Megaphone Staff, '14-'15; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '13-'14; Intermediate 
Debater, '13-'14; San Jacinto-Rusk Debate, '14-'15; Pres. Y. M. C. A., '15-'16; Pres. 
Mood Hall Honor Council, '15-'16; Peace Orator, '15-'16. 

SAM R. HAY, Dallas. 

Phi Delta Theta; Tennis Team, '14-'15; Secretary Intercollegiate Tennis Association, 
'15-'16; Basket Ball Team, 15-'16; Captain Basket Ball, '16; Assistant Manager 
Foot Ball, '15; Manager Foot Ball, '16. 







1 39 










ROBERT D. HODGES, Palestine. 
Phi Delta Theta; Alamo. 

RUTH GODDARD, Galveston. 

Clio; Orchestra Accompanist; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '15-'16; Woman's Self Govern- 
ment Association, '15-'16; Magazine Staff, '15-'16; President Clio, Spring Term, '15-'16. 

C, R. HOOTON, Mineral Wells. 

PI. K. A.; Alamo; President Freshman Class, '14; Glee Club. '14, '15, '16; S. U. 
Quartet, '14, '15, '16; Mood Hall Honor Council, '15; Assistant Manager Track, '15; 
Sou'wester Staff, '16; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '16; Manager Glee Club, '16. 

MARK HUBBARD, Henderson. 

Clio; Clio President, "14-'15; Basket Ball Team, '15-'16; Secretary Girls' Athletic 
Association, '15-'16. 

LOUIS F. JORDAN, Georgetown. 

B. C. LAWS, Beerille. 

Kappa Alpha: Base Ball, '15-'16: Assistant Manager Track, '15-'16. 







'wtor 



tntoP 



£&W5 



140 










*£<irt£ 












MARION MALLARD, Rusk- 
Delta, Delta Delta; Clio; Woman's Honor Council, '13-'14; University Honor Council, 
'14-'15; Vice-President Sophomore Class; Secretary Students' Association, '15-'16; 
Prep. Faculty, 15-'16. 

W. T. MATLOCK, Flore sville. 

Kappa Sigma; Base Ball, '14-'15, 15-'16; Mood Hall Honor Council, '15-16. 

E. SINKS McLARTY, Crockett. 

Phi Delta Theta; Base Ball, '13-'14, '14-*15; Orchestra, '13'14, 14-'15; Chemistry Club. 

A. M. LIMMER, Bartlett. 

T. LEE, JR., Bastrop. 

Glee Club, Three Years; Foot Ball, '15-'16; President Junior Class, '15-'16; Assist- 
and Manager of Sou'Wester; Assistant Manager of Basket Ball; Secretary of "S" 
Association; Secretary-Treasurer of Prohibition League. 

VANCE HARDY, Cameron. 
Delta Delta Delta. 







1 4 1 















. 
















THOMAS MONSEY MITCHELL, Linn Flat. 
Alamo; Intermediate Debate, '12-'] 3. 

A. B. PARTAIN, Georgetown. 

Phi Delta Theta: Alamo; German Society. 

MARY MULLENS, Georgetown. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

EUGENE ALLEN PERRIN, Georgetown. 

Honor Council, '15-'16; Student Instructor in Mathematics. 

HATTIE NELMS, Weatherford. 

ZTA; University Honor Council, 13-'14; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '15-16; Pan-Hellenic, 
'15-'16; Member of Executive Committee of Student Body, '15-'16. 

CHESTER C. PRIDEAUX, Farmer. 
Phi Delta Theta. 







etrxty 



/*»trr>s / $y<tetf& 









1 4 2 
















^10^ 



LUTHER D. RECTOR, San Antonio. 

GILPIN SHELTON SESSIONS, Okmulgee, Okla. 

Pi KA; Foot Ball Team, '15-'16; Assistant Manager Megaphone; Track Team, 

'14-'15, '15-'16; Treasurer "S" Association. 

SUSIE RILEY, Georgetown. 

W. ANGIE SMITH, JR. 

KA; Alamo; President Freshman Class, '13-'14; Freshman-Sophomore Declamation 
Medal, '13-'14; Intermediate Debate, '13-'14; Brooks Prize Debate, '14-'15; Inter- 
collegiate Debate, 15-'16; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '14-'15, '15-'16; Sou'Wester Staff, '14-15, 
'15-'16; President of Anti-Mob Association, '15-'16; Lecture Committee, '15-'16; Sec- 
retary Oratorical Association, '15-'16; Pan-Hellenic Council, '15-'16; Assistant Basket 
Ball Manager, '15-'16; Student Instructor History, '15-'16; Mood Hall Honor Council, 
•15-'16. 

NELLIE TALLEY, Georgetown. 

Alpha Delta Pi; Scholarship Society; Chemistry Club. 

WM. E. WATSON, Georgetown. 
KA; Alamo. 







?&ii&\ 



msdo 












143 










MsoV 









MARY WATSON, Uvalde. 

Phi Mu; Honor Council, *15-'16; Secretary Junior Class, '16. 

MARY LYNN WALKER, Temple. 

Alethean; Basket Ball, '13-'14, '15-'16; Honor Council; Die Verein; Tennis Club. 

ROBERT L. TAYLOR, Cooledge. 

Intermediate Debate, '16; Three Years at A. M. College of Alabama; One Year 
Vanderbilt, Law Department. 

CLAUDE WILLIS, Cross Cut. 

Barb; San Jacinto; Intermediate Debate, '15; Triangular Debate, '16; Assistant 
Manager of Magazine, '15. 

ANNA CECIL EVANS, Uvalde. 

Clio; Basket Ball Team, '15-'16. 

GLADYS HARDEMAN, Nacogdoches. 

ADP; Y. W. C. A.; Clio; Woman's Honor Council, 13-'14. 










****e*f 



144 










1 45 












SOPHOMORE CLASS 












OFFICERS 

FALL TERM 

Ruth Blanks President 

W. W. Simons Vice-President 

Fannie Lee Wilson Secretary-Treasurer 

WINTER TERM 

I [enry Si raw President 

[one Irwin Vice-President 

Dorothea Bishop Secretary-Treasurer 

SPRING TERM 

T. H. McDaniel President 

Marion Mallard Vice-President 

H. R. Knickerbocker Secretary-Treasurer 

HONOR COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES 
Ruth Onderdonk II. I\. Knickerbocker 






1 4>> 













KATHLEEN ALEXANDER, Meridian. 
Delta Delta Delta, Alethean. 

CARROLL S. ATKINSON, Lufkin. 
Alamo. 

ANNA LAURIE BASS, Abilene. 

ZTA; Orchestra, '14, '15, '16; Y. W. 
C. A.; Der Verein. 

RUTH BLANKS, San Angelo. 

Delta Delta Delta; Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil, '15-'16; President Sophomore 
Class, '15-'16; President Alethean, '15 
'16. 

C. I. BOUNDS, Worth a i,'. 

Phi Delta Theta; Assistant Track 
Manager. 

ARTHUR BURNS, Cuero. 
Phi Delta Theta. 



RAYMOND BREWER, Caldwell. 

Phi Delta Theta; Alamo; President 
BYeshman Class, '14-'15; Base Ball, 
'15-T6; Captain Base Ball, '15-T6; 
Executive Committee of Students' 
Association. 



DOROTHEA BISHOP, Georgetown. 

Delta Delta Delta; Alethean; Secre- 
tary Sophomore Class, '16. 

REUBEN BIGGS, LeesviUe. 

San Jacinto; Ministerial Association; 
Track; Secretary Ministerial Associa- 
tion, '15-'16. 

ROBERT E. BROWN, Waco. 

Pi KA; Assistant Editor Mega- 
phone; Assistant Editor Sou'Wester; 
Publicity Correspondent. 















147 










RECTOR COFFEE, Georgetown. 

KA; Assistant Manager Foot Ball. 
'16-'17; Foot Ball, '14-'15. 



N. DOW CHAPMAN. Leander. 
Kappa Sigma. 

JOE A. COUGHRAN, Floresville. 

Kappa Sigma; Assistant Base Ball 
Manager, '15-'16. 



S. F. DRAKE, JR., Kerrville. 

Phi Delia Theta. 



H. S. DeVORE, Sophomore Houston. 

Pi KA; San Jacinto; Glee Club, 
'15-'16; Intercollegiate Debate, '14- 
'15: Brooks Prize Debate, '16; Presi- 
dent Intercollegiate Prohibition Asso- 
ciation, '16. 



HARRY ELLIS, Holdenville, OkJa. 
Kappa Sigma; Alamo. 






FLOYD C. CROWNOVER, Llano. 
Alamo; Hard Nine, '15-'16. 

WILLIE BLOUNT, Nacogdoches. 

ADP; Pan-Hellenic: Y. W. C. A. 



JOHN N. ELLYSON Georgetown. 

Assistant Gymnasium Director. '14- 
'15, '15-'16. 

J. VOLNA EASTMAN, Ladonia. 
Kappa Sigma. 






14B 







JESSIE H. FORESTER, (loJdthwaite. 
KA; Base Ball Team, 15-'16. 



WM. S. HIGHSMITH, Hutto. 
San Jacinto. 
























II. W. GRAY, Cherokee. 

Pi KA; San Jacinto; Intermediate 
Debate, '14-T5; Intercollegiate De- 
bate, '15-'16. 



OTHA HORGER, Georgetown. 



PAUL HIGHTOWER, Georgetown. 

Kappa Sigma: Glee Club, '14-T5, 
15-'16. 



WESLEY HARDT, Hondo. 

Barb; San Jacinto; Freshman- Soph- 
omore Debate, '16. 



10NE IRWIN, Floresville. 

ZTA; Clio Vice President, '15-'16; Y. 
W. C. A. Vice President, '15-'16. 



L. D. HARDT, Honda. 

San Jacinto; Cheer Leader, '11-T2, 
'15-T6; Glee Club, '15-'16. 



JANE GRACE JOHNSTON, Uvalde. 

Alethean; Orchestra, '13-'14, '14'-15, 



'15-'16. 



L. F. JORDAN, Georgetown. 









1 49 





















<%*!)& . 



VANCE N. JENKINS, Sealy. 

RAYMOND S. JACQUES, Dalhart. 
Phi Delta Theta. 



MARVIN W. MARSH, San Marcos. 

Pi KA: TB of BP; Foot Ball Team, 
'15; Captain Foot Ball,. '16; "S" As- 
sociation. 



R. ROY JOBSON, Mesquite. 

Alamo; Die Gesellschaft, '14-'15; Die 
Verein, '15-'16; Alamo Intermediate 
Debate, '15-'16. 

H. R. KNICKERBOCKER, Houston. 

KA; Megaphone Staff, '15-'16; San 
Jacinto Intermediate Debate, '15-'16; 
University Honor Council, '15-'16. 

V. S. LeTULLE, Bay City. 
Phi Delta Theta. 

J. T. LEESON, Abilene. 

Phi Delta Theta; Assistant Base Ball 
Manager, '15-'16. 



ALAN K. MANCHESTER, Georgetown. 
Kappa Sigma; Alamo; Mission Band; 
Editor-in-Chief Prep, Book of An- 
nual, '13-'14; Alamo Intermediate De- 
bater, '15-'16; Glee Club, 15-'16; Meg- 
aphone Staff, *15-'16. 

MARGARET McKENNON, Columbua, 
Tennessee. 

Delta Delta Delta; Alethean; Vice 
President of the Freshman Class for 
the good year 1915 and 1916. 

T, H. McDANIEL, Flore sville. 

Pi K. A.; Base Ball, '14-'15, '15-'16. 









1 50 



































atwood Mcdonald, Azie. 

Alamo; Magazine Staff. 



MARY NOWLIN, Georgetown. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 






KATHLEEN McKNIGHT, Temple. 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Bell County Club. 



RUTH MCMILLAN, Calvert. 



G. H. MERRITT, Center Point. 

San Jacinto, San Jacinto Interme- 
diate Orator, '15-'16. 



RUTH ONDERDONK, San Antonio. 

Delta Delta Delta; Alethean; Y. W. 
C. A.; Mission Band; Lecture Com- 
mittee; University Honor Council, 
'15-'16. 



FRANK G. RAGSDALE, San Antomo. 
Mission Band; Sou'wester Staff, '15- 
'16. 



CARRIE ROGERS, Sulphur Springs. 
Clio; Honor Council, '15-'16. 



LULAH ROTHCHILD, Tyler. 

Phi Mu; Alethean; Pan-Hellenic; 
Honor Council, '15-'16. 



W. W. SIMONS, Edna. 






151 













class 



MABEL SHANDS, Houston. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 



MARY D. TANNER, Malakoff. 
Zeta Tau Alpha. 



J. FORT SMITH, Mexia. 

ETHA SIMMONS, Coleman. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

W. B. SLACK, Taylor. 

K. A.; Alamo; Megaphone Staff, 14- 
'15-'16; Magazine Staff. 15-16; Mood 
Hall "Hard Nine" 15-16. 

HENRY STRAW, Gatesville. 

K. A.; Alamo Megaphone Staff, 14 
15; Magazine Staff, '14-15; President 
of Freshman Class; Editor Mega- 
phone, 15-16; President Sophomore 
Class, 15-16; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 
15-16. 






J. G. TIMMONS, Mart. 

Barb; San Jacinto; Mood Hall Honor 
Council, 14-15; San Jancinto Inter- 
mediate Debate, 15-16; Vice Pres- 
ident San Jacinto. 

GLADYS S. TINSLEY, Georgetown. 
Alethean. 

FANNIE LEE WILSON, Elgin. 
Delta Delta Delta. 

GRACE WISEMAN, Georgetown. 

PAINE WILLIAMS, McDade. 
Phi Delta Theta. 



l 5a 





1 58 


















FRESHMAN CLASS 



COLOR 
Emerald 

FLOWER 

Green Peas 

MOTTO 

"All for the Green". 

OFFICERS 

FALL TERM 

Everett E. Martin President 

Margaret McKennon Vice-President 

Lalu Shands Secretary-Treasurer 

WINTER TERM 

Dell AIcKenzie President 

Gladys Brewer Vice-President 

Dixie Tucker Secretary-Treasurer 

SPRING TERM 

Union Clabaugh President 

Dixie Tucker Vice-President 

Milda Barton Secretary-Treasurer 

Class Historian Inez Ayres 

HONOR COFXCIL REPRESENTATIVES 
Helen Oatman Arthur Knickerbocker 






1 64 











fpjg 



s~~m~^~s^r^V [ ~i 






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a f ■ a ^ j&' j^s. 




SOME FRESHMEN GROUPS 



1 56 












Roll of Freshman Class 



Ayres, Inez 
Allen, Dillard 
AtLee, L. W. 
Bass, Lila 
Brandenburg, Etta 
Barrett, Owen 
Belford, W. W. 
Berry, J. L. 
Biggs, Reuben 
Browne, M. L. 
Brown, R. R. 
Buford, B. R. 
Bryan, Ruth 
Barnes, May Lewis 
Baird, Eugenia 
Barton, Milda 
Blaine, Mary 
Booty, Sterner 
Brewer, Gladys 
Bailey, A. W. 
Baker, P. B. 
Bayless, Norman 
Briggs, H. E. 
Carr, Josie 
Carter, J. 0. 
Clabaugh, J. V. 
Clark, C. R, 
Coffee, Rector 
Collier, Faust 
Cowsert, C. C. 
Crook, W. W. 
Chisholm, D. A. 
Drake, S. F. 
Dye, Baxter 
Dunnam, S. M. 
Davis, Bessie 
Davis, Louise 
De Villus, Leta 
Dawson, W. A. 
Day, Walton 



DeTarr. T. W. 

Dillard, Allen 
Erhard, Edyth 
English, Bryson 
Edens, Servie 
Eppler, W. R. 
Ewing, G. B. 
Glenn, Ruth 
Goode, Mabel 
Gardner, H. L. 
Gillett, Helen 
Guver, Faith 
Gilchrist, Surry 
Gillett, John S. 
Gilleland, Mackey 
Gilleland, Bolton 
Gillette, B. M. 
Harwick, Delza 
Hazel, Tom 
Howard, Dorothea 
Hamilton, V. F. 
Horger, Lewis 
Hughes, F. 
Hardin, Lucile 
Haygood, Allene 
Hazel, Ellen 
Harris, J. H. 
Harwell, J. G. 
Harwell, W. B. 
Hole, W. Y. 
Huckabee, Edward 
Hudson, R. D. 
Hooks, J. K. 
Jennings, Lillian 
Johnson, Lula 
Jones, H. S. 
Jones, Ruth 
Keller, Virginia 
King, Shirley 
Kilgore, Hartman 






1 50 







Roll of Freshman Class 

( Continued) 



Knickerbocker, A. B. 
Landrum, < •ni;i 
Lee, Lucy 
Lloyd, Ruth 
Lemmon, Grace 
Lovett, Willie 
Lamb, Irene 
Lucore, J. G. 
McKennon, Margaret 
McMahon, Verna 
McMillan, Ruth 
Magee, Lois 
Martin, Ella 
Mills, Mai tie 
Moss, Myrtle 
McKinley, Allie 
McKenzie, D. A. 
.Mallard, J. J. 
Martin, B. E. 
Martin, Walter 
Mauldin, H. H. 
Means, V. R. 
Merritt, G. 11. 
Merrem, W. L\ 
Mitchell, L. H. 
Moore, Christie 
McClendon, R. E. 
McGaughey, M. D. 
McNeil, Clare 
Martin, Hobson 
Martin, Reynold 
Miller, Carroll 
Moses, U. M. 
Munime, A. 0. 
Martin, Willie 
Mason, J. .1. 
Matlock, L. R, 
Nevil, William 



Nixon, Max 
( latnian, I lelen 
Pari-, Lillian 
Parr, Ruth 
Peace, Lillian 
Parker, L. J. 
Parter, R, C. 
Perrin, Clarence 
Quinn, P. S. 
Roberts, Helen 
Riley, G. W. Jr. 
Ragsdale, Kennith 
Ridgeway, Tom 
Robertson, Maclin, Jr. 
Schrock, Martha. 
Smith, Agnes 
Stewart, Vada 
Stile, Charlotte 
Seale, Everette 
Simmons, H. P. 
Smith, -1. F. 
Sparks, R. B. 
Smith, D. F. 
Smith, R. C. 
Shands, Lain 
Sullivan, Edna 
Smith, R, M. 
Stindt, W. H. 
Swickheimer, W. D. 
Sharbutt, J. W. 
Thompson, Bess 
Thompson, F. A. 
Trott, Bobbie 
Tucker, Dixie 
Van Pelt, D. 
Walker, W. C. 
Wells, Daman 
Wilson, L. K. 









1 57 

















THE BEAUTIFUL 







15B 





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thletics 



V 




THE ATHLETIC COUNCIL 



1 59 

















J. BURTON RIX 
Head of Atliletics <ii Southwestern. 

No eulogy need be written of Mr. Rix. His work speaks for itself. During his 
I wo years as head of Athletics at Southwestern there has been a steady improvement 
:'.: our teams. Last fall, with only one letter man returning, many people thought thei*r> 
was little chance for a good team this year. What could be expected from a bunch of 
light men who had never seen service in College Football? However these people did 
tiot know Rix as they know him now. They did not know that out of a bunch of green 
Freshmen he could develop a team I bat would win a majority of its games from the 
best teams in the state. Southwestern is proud of Rix. 






1 60 




























1 6 1 









Football Schedule for 1915 



October 12 — Southwestern 3, Hendrix College 0, at Georgetown 
October 23 — Southwestern 0, Baylor University 10, at Georgetown. 
( >ctober 30 — Southwestern 0, University of Texas 45, at Austin 
November 6 — Southwestern 15, Daniel Baker College 0, at Georgetown 
November 12 — Southwestern 0, Texas Christian University 21, at Georgetown 
November 29 — Southwestern 21, Southern Methodist University 0, at Dallas 
November 25 — Southwestern 7. Austin College 6, at Sherman 



LETTER MEN 



J. Burton Rix, Head Coach 
George F. Pierce, Manager 

Hoyle, Archie Lee, Theo. 

Marsh, Marvin Bri<ji>\s, Horace 

Quinn, Pat Weimers, M. W. 

Bode, E. W. Vaughn, C. C. 

Knickerbocker, Arthur Carter, O. W. 

Harris, John Sessions, Gilpin 









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Football Personnel 



MARVIN MARSH 
Qtiarter 
Willi an enviable record at Coronal 
and having been selected as Ail State 
Quarter in the realm of Prepdom, 
iviarsh came to us this year and more 
than lived up to his reputation, in a 
never-failing way he played at full- 
back and halt' back during the early 
i art of the season and later at quarter 
steered the team through several vic- 
tories. Southwestern has had few 
men who were better ground gainers 
than Marsh, and his punting compared 
favorably with any seen on the Texas 
gridiorns this year. As Captain of the 
liilti team he should lead an aggrega- 
tion that will be hard to stop. 



PAT QUINN 
Right Halfback 

Pat was one of the most efficient 
and competent men on the eleven. His 
experience with Houston High School 
put him in line for a steady place on 
any college team. He is fast and one 
ot the best ground gainers on the line 
plunges and end runs the university 
has known for a number of years. We 
look forward to Pat's return next 
year. 



E. W. BODE 
Left Halfback 
Undoubtedly the fastest man on tin 
team — Bode was dangerous in a brok- 
en field. He hit his real stride in the 
last few games of the season. After 
seeing his brother play such remarka- 
ble foot ball in the Scrub - Cherokee 
game he put forth a greater effort to 
bring up his part of the family's rep- 
utation. Bode made a letter under 
Snipes in 1912 and his return this year 
was met with much rejoicing in ath 
letic circles. He has gained many- 
yards for the Gold and Black by his 
speed. Especially can he keep them 
guessing on returning punts. 















1 6 4 










Football Personnel 



('. C. VAUGHN 

Left Tackle 

Vaughn is one of the Coronal trio 
who came to us this year. He was a 
very valuable man, being equally de- 
pendable on the offensive and defen- 
sive. We expect him to develop lots 
of speed by the opening of the 1916 
season and with another year under 
Rix he should develop into a linesman 
of note. 



T. LEE 

Center 

"T" may be light, but to watch him 
break through the line and tackle the 
man with the ball you would not think 
so. He was very accurate in passing 
the ball, but his long suite was break- 
ing up forward passes and recovering 
fumbles. His ability to keep his eye 
on the ball all the time and to follow 
up the plays won for him the distinc- 
tion of making the first touchdown of 
the season. 



ARTHUR KNICKERBOCKER 

Fullback 

Everybody calls him "Knick," but 
the real name he has earned on the 
gridiron is "Grit."' He got better all 
the season and in the last few games 
played a high class of ball. The reason 
for "Knick's" remarkable improvement 
is simple enough. He has the ability 
for downright hard work and plenty 
of it. In fact he enjoys it and when a 
coach finds that sort of a man he 
usually makes something out of him. 













1 65 














Football Personnel 



JOHN HARRIS 

Left Guard 

Johnnie is the biggest man on the 
team and his 212 pounds avoirdupois 
made quite a respectable showing 
against any line in the state. If there 
was a gain over Johnnie something 
was wrong and people began to wonder 
immediately. His best work was in 
the T. C. U. and S. M. U. games. He 
has three more years of College Fool 
Ball ahead of him which fact must 
give the Coach a comfortable feeling. 



J. O. CARTER 

Left Halfback and Left End. 

"Spec" came to us from Coronal with 
a reputation as an all-State Prep and 
he has thoroughly lived up to his rep- 
utation. He is a snappy man in the 
back field and equally good at end. 
As the Coach says "Little Spec will 
go where you call him." 



HORACE BRIGGS 

Right Guard 

The bleachers were rather skeptical 
about Briggs in the early part of the 
season. They were inclined to think 
that a man with his scanty experience 
would stand small chance in spite of 
his big build. But Briggs showed them 
in the first game just what he was 
made of by snatching down a couple 
of forward passes and racing down the 
field for substantial gains. He also 
played in the line like a veteran. 









166 




Football Personnel 



ARCHIE HOYL 

Right Tackle 

Archie, being the only "S" man re- 
turning irem last lear's team, was 
elected honorary captain for 1915. He 
tilled the place in a thoroughly satis- 
factory manner. Some players may 
fail but Archie can always be relied 
upon to hold down his end of the bar- 
gain. And it didn't make much differ- 
ence whether that bargain were an 
All-State Guard or a Scrub Tackle, if 
was all the same to Archie. He was 
right there to do the mule's part — "his 
durndest." A very fast and sure man, 
Hoyl was a great asset to the team. 



GILPIN SESSIONS 

Right End 

Sessions started on the Scrubs this 
year, but he didn't stay there long — 
in fact only about fifteen minutes. 
Hard consistent work won him a place 
in every game. Shifted from tackle to 
end in the latter part of the season, he 
proved to be an impassable barrier to 
the opponents, and his long run at 
Sherman almost made him famous. 
With this season's work and exper- 
ience Session should become one of the 
mainstays of the team next year. 



MARVIN WEIMERS 

Left Tackle 

"Dutchman," as everybody knows 
him, was one of the most dependable 
men on the team. When the opponents 
tried to plunge through the left side 
of the line they found the whole Ger- 
man army there waiting for them — at 
least they thought so before "Dutch" 
got through with them. A sure man 
on both offense and defense. 




1 67 








Football Personnel 

GEORGE F. PIERCE 

Manager 

After numerous expliots in the field 
of o. liege activities "Dago" turned his 
attention to managing a foot ball team. 
And be it said to his credit, he did it 
extremely well. He endeared himself 
to the heart of every 1915 Foot Ball 
player by giving the team the very 
best to be had on every trip. He was 
a consistent worker on the field while 
at home, and jvst as a little diversion, 
he coached the Prep. team. We be- 
lieve that the season would have been 
much less successful if we had not had 
"Dago" to manage the business for us. 



















BETWEEN HALVES 






I I i i ! 



























1 68 
















1 70 









Southwestern Scrubs 



One of the best expressions of loyalty to old Southwestern is witnessed 
every fall on Snyder field by these who watch the second team or what 
is commonly known as the "Scrubs". Fancy putting yourself in a place 
every afternoon for two long months, to be used as a practice instrument in 
perfecting' the regulars, a place which brings but little praise and glory, but 
one that sifts a mans soul and shows his yellow streak or his true blue metal. 
All honor to the S. U. Scrubs of 1915 a more loyal bunch of men never donned 
Foot Ball togs. 

The Scrubs were coached by George Trotter of Mississippi and managed 
by Carol Dixon of San Antonio. Aside from the scrimmages with the first 
team they found time to play lour outside games, of this number they won 
tw r o and lost two. 



Schedule of Scrub Football Team 






Oct. 19th Cherokee Junior College at Georgetown 

Oct. 30th Southwestern Preps 

Nov. 26th Southwest Texas Normal at San Marcos 

Nov. 27th Temple High School at Temple 

List of players and positions : 

(7) Gorsline capt., L. IT., Mo. (15) 
(14) Morgan, F. Back (3) 

(9) Horger, Lewis, R. H. (13) 

(11) Buford, Ben., F. B. (5) 

(8) Cowan, John, Q. B. (10) 
(4) Biggs, Reuben, L. B. 

(12) Clabaugh, J. U., R. E. (2) 
(1) Rice, M. H., R. T. (6) 



Cowsert, L. T. 
Cook, Lock, B. G. 
Walker, Curtis, L. G. 
Allen, Dillard, C. 
Parker, Judge, Sub. 
Trotter, Geo., Coach 
Dixon, Carol, Mgr. 
Coughran, Joe, R. II. 












1 7 1 















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BASEBALL 



Coach Jack Ashton. 

Manager J. L. Lyons. 

Captain Raymond Brewer. 









. 



PLAYERS 

Catcher Ben Laws. 

First base Haywood McDaniel. 

Second base Jessie Forrester and Paul Baker. 

Third base William Matlock. 

Short stop Raymond Brewer. 

Left field Curtis Walker. 

Center field Ben Buford. 

Right field George Smith. 

[E. Sinks McLarty, 
Pitchers D. A. McKenzie, 

[William Watson. Simmons. 

SCHEDULE. 

March 24 Chicago White Sox Georgetown. 

March 27 Texas University Austin. 

March 29 Chinese University Georgetown. 

March 31 Baylor University Waco. 

April 1 Baylor University Waco. 

April 5 Texas University Georgetown. 

April 8 Howard Payne Georgetown. 

April 11-12 S. M. U Georgetown. 

April 17-18 University of Arkansas Georgetown. 

April 21 Texas University Georgetown. 

April 2~'-28 Austin College Georgetown. 

May 1-2 T. C. U Georgetown. 

May 8-9 A. and M College Station. 

May 10-11 Rice Houston. 

May 17-18 A. and M Georgetown. 

May 19-20 T. C. U Fort Worth. 

May 22-23 Trinity Waxahachie. 

May 24-25 S. M. U Dallas. 

May 26-27 .Univ. of Arkansas Fayetteville, Arkansas 



176 











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Baseball Personnel 






BEN LAWS, Catcher. 

Ben was a close wider-study of the immortal Titus Harris for a number 
of years and when his time did come he showed his ability as a student. He 
has a good eye at sizing up a batter and his whip to second keeps them all 
guessing-. 






RAYMOND BREWER, Shortstop. 

"Dick" is the fastest shortstop in college baseball; his work has given 
him all-state mention. Not only has Brewer held down the short field with 
style but as Captain he has aided the Coach in may ways with the "green" 
material. 






D. A. McKENZTE, Pitcher. 

"Big Mac" was a real stand-by for Coach Ashton's pitching staff. 
The big fellow had a line of "Hooks" curves, fast and "fool" balls well gov- 
erned by the old time control that struck out many a batter. Some people 
attribute his ability to the fact that he was born and reared in Floresville. 



1 78 








Baseball Personnel 






BILL MATLOCK, Third Base. 

Bill would look good on any man's team. The way he covers the third 
corner has caused much comment from base ball authorities. He is the most 
efficient third baseman Southwestern has known. He is also a good batter. 
Some people did not realize how important Bill was until he had to drop off 
of the team for a few days on account of injuries. 

GEORGE SMITH, Right Field. 

Smith just discovered he was an athlete this year. George came out 
for Basketball and made one of the best guards in the State. Next he tried 
Baseball and made good in the National Sport. We hope he will try Foot- 
ball next fall. 

E. SINKS McLARTY, Pitcher. 

Sinks is a left-handed twister and this is his third year in the box. He 
is noted for his cpiick throws, which catch many base runners off first. He 
keeps cool through-out the game, always smiling and wearing a glass front. 






179 


















Baseball Personnel 



SIMMONS, Pitcher. 

"Possey" has got lots of speed and control; his pitching in the exhibi- 
tion games shrowed his ability in the box. Coach Ashton likes the way Sim- 
mons puts 'em over. 







T. HAYWOOD McDANIEL, First Base. 

Hayywood is an all-state man on First ; he covers the initial ba»' with a 
style never before seen about Southwestern. He gets all the bad throws, 
his foot work is wonderful and but Few hits are made down first base line. 



BEN BITPORD, Center. 

Ben was lead off man and a good steady one too. He knows how to 
look 'em over, and is a good hitter. Ben seldom muffs a t'ly and lie has a peg 
like a rifle shot. 






1 no 











If. 




Baseball Personnel 



JESSIE FORESTER, Second Base. 

"Preacher" hails from Coronal Institute where he made a good record 
as shortstop. He is a good man 1'or second as well. Jessie skoops the hot 
ones, and a good man to receive a peg. 

CURTIS WALKER, Left Field. 

Whop O'Lotie is the heaviest hitter on the nine. He came here with 
a good High School record and left with a hetter college percentage. Walker 
established a "rep" when he hatted 1000 per cent in the White Sox game. 

JACK ASHTON, Coach. 

Jack Ahston formerly of the Navigators got his release from manager 
Hardy this year and spent the entire season coaching Southwestern. Along 
this line he has shown wonderful ability, for with nothing save a good in- 
field he developed out of the raw recruits one of the leading teams in the 
T. I. A. A. He is a coach for whom the players will always give their best 
efforts. They are anxious to win for "Jack." 






1 8 1 






















Baseball Personnel 

BILLY WATSON, Pitcher. 

Billy plays where you put him, he has held down the Key-stone corner, 
has worked at short, but his most efficient position is in the box. He has a line of 
curves, drops and fast balls that intake many batters look like wood cutters. Billy 
did exceedingly well in the S. M. U. game, allowing only two hits, and in the 
nine innings only twenty nine men faced him. 

PAUL BAKER, Second base. 

Paul is a little man but covers the second sack in a good style and he 
is a good hitter. His two years of experience with the Kemp Amature Club 
where he headed the hitting column last year makes him a valuable man. 
With this years experience on the University team he will make a wonderful 
little college player and we look forward to his return next year. 

JOE LUCORE, Catcher. 

Joe was an inclinable catcher on account of the ten days matriculation 
rule. But his work deserves special mention. He caught all the exibition 
games and never pulled an error, his peg is good and he is familial' with the 
willow. Lucore hails from Houston where he made a wonderful record with 
the High School team. 












1 8 2 























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Basket Ball Schedule With Results 



A. and M. 38 at College Station 
Rice Institute 48 at Houston 
Texas 35 at Austin 
Stanford College 14 at Stanford 
Simmons College 16 at Abilene 
Simmons College 24 at Abilene 
T. C. U. 22 at Fort Worth 
Simmons College 18 at Georgetown 
Texas 52 at Georgetown 
T. C. U. 14 at Georgetown 



"S" MEN 

J. Burton Eix Coach 

Hugh S. Carter Manager 

Sam Hay Captain 

Arthur Knickerbocker George Smith 

D. A. McKenzie Pat Quhm 

Clarence Perrin John Harris 



Jan. 


14 


Southwestern 5 


Jan. 


15 


Southwestern 8 


Jan. 


22 


Southwestern 5 


Jan. 


25 


Southwestern 17 


Jan. 


26 


Southwestern 28 


Jan. 


27 . 


Southwestern 16 


Jan. 


28 


Southwestern 24 


Feb. 


3 


Southwestern 24 


Feb. 


5 


Southwestern 33 


Feb. 


9 . 


Southwestern 43 






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Girls 1 Athletic Council 

A I ;i ry I )u n lap Presi< lent 

Mary Lynne Walker Vice-President 

Mark Eubbard Secretary-Treasurer 

Rowena < Inderdonk Captain of Basket Ball 

Inez Dunlap Manager of Basket Ball 

Vera Smith President of Tennis Club 

Physical culture is given prominent place in the college life of Soul li- 
western women. Freshman girls are required to attend gymnasium classes. 
Many find delight on the numerous tennis courts and in the camp fire clubs. 

Basket hall attracts the largesl number. In this game Southwestern 
fixes the standard. Physical examination by a competent physician is re- 
quired o]' all players before they are admitted to practice. 

Tlic various class learns have manifested much enthusiasm in the eon- 
test for the Stromberg-Hoffman championship cup. 






1 88 





















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Girls 1 Basket Ball Team 1916 



THE TEAM 

Rowena Onderdonk Captain, Jumping Center and Forward 

Gladys Brewer Side Center 

Ellen Hazle Side Center and Forward 

Mary Lynne Walker Forward 

Anne Cecil Evans Jumping Center and Forward 

Mark Hubbard Guard 

Inez Dmilap Guard 

RECORD FOR 1916 

Southwestern 46; Austin High 4 
Southwestern 16 ; T. C. U. 8 
Southwestern 23 ; T. W. C. 17 
Southwestern 28; St. Mary's College 10 
Southwestern 22; University of Texas 24 (*) 
(*) Score tied at end of Second Half. 









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A Corner of Our Library 



Dedication: this little corner of our library is respectfully dedicated to 
the man who can read a joke on himself and laugh — this means you DeVore. 



EDITORIAL PREPAREDNESS 

Some people tell jokes to get the class in a good humor — like Prof. 
Moore ; some people tell jokes to illustrate a point — like Prof. Granbery ; some 
people tell jokes to atone for their presence among- the ladies — like Jackson; 
but there are some people that tell jokes just for "pure cussedness" — like Ben 
Leigh ; we are somewhat like Ben, we also write jokes to fill up the space. 



DIRECTIONS FOR READING THESE BOOKS 












1. Expect to find many dry ones — you will not be disapointed. 

2. There's nothing- original under the sun. 

3. You have made a fool of yourself (Didn't know it had gotten out on you, 

did you?) 

4. We've made a fool of ourselves (You prohahly will think of several in- 

stances without our help) 

5. We edited these books. (A bold confession!!!) 

6. Don't look for us in them. (Except of course in a flattering way.) 

7. We can explain the point to these jokes (If you can find us!!!) 



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KATHLEEN ALEXANDER 



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195 












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BERNICE COOK 



197 











HE young ladies of South- 
western University stage 
on the Womans Buildins> 
Campus on the first day 
of May each year one or 
the most gorgeous and 
elaborate pageants ever 
given in this part of 
the State. 

Miss Rowena Onder- 
donk of San Antonio was 
crowned Queen of May 
this year. Her court 
rivaled those of the olden 
days in beauty and ele- 
gance. 

Following the corona- 
tion there were many 
beautiful festivities en- 
acted by young ladies re- 
presenting maids of many 
climes and nationalities. 
Many friends' of Southwestern and large number of her alumni visited 
Georgetown in May to participate in this the annual event. 

Spring is a time of joy and gladness and Southwestern gladly welcomes 
her friends to this gala occasion. 









198 








MfiY FETE 







199 





















Marriage Licenses 

The age together with a brief description of the victims. 




Mary Davidson '57— 
From Arkansas 

Warren Hull — Age, look a1 
his 1ee1ii 

His father is a doctor in San 
Antonio and lias a Ford Au- 
tomobile 



Vance Hardy 19 — 
Will take the pin on the wed- 
ding day 

Tucker 27— 

Mrs. Armstrong likes him so 

this is the end. 



A nine Laurie Bass 12 — 
Still wears bobbed hair 

Sam Hay 13 — 
Son of Sam R. Hay 



Leta DeVilbis 24— 

All life is a matrimonial 

school 

C. B. Harbor 19— 

A bachelor parsonage is such 

a lonesome place. 









CANDIDATES 



Girls 
Cornelia Gayden 
Tennie Mae Bass 
Aline Haygood 
Inez Ayres 
Lila Bass 
Lilian Jennings 






Boys 
C. R. Hooten 
H. S. Carter 
Jimme Lyons 
Fred Francis 
Clabaugh 
Leeson 

Stanley Haver 
"Doc" Mitchel 









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Anti Oscillatory League 

President Fred Francis 

Vice-President Elizabeth Smyrl 

Sec. & Treas Percy Black 

Demonstrator of the evil Stanley Haver 

Flower Touch-me-not 

Motto Beware of pretty lips 



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Burpee's Garden Catalogue 



SWEET WILLIAM 
TEXAS 

This far-famed, auricula-eyed plant, the most beautiful and admired of all Wil- 
liams. Especially thrives on aesthetic cultivation in English rooms, where it becomes 
strikingly brilliant and beautiful. 

5c per Dozen. 

GAS PLANT 

A very showy, curios flower, giving off on warm evenings or other times, under 
stimulation or without, an asphyxiating gas. When a match is applied at the head 
it burns freely, and thrives best at night. It is advisable to transplant frequently as 
they are most appreciated when first seen. Instances are known where this plant has 
killed father, son, grandson — and lady. 

NONE-SO-PRETTY 

We are at a loss to understand why this beauty of Grapeland, a native of the 
sticks of South Texas, was not discovered sooner. For forty years it cast its sweetness 
on the desert air, but with indifferent results, and it is only recently that its merit 
as a Saw Bone has been discovered. Has been known to withstand a temperature of 
500 degrees F. 

Not for Sale. 

GARLIC 

This species of garlic is the prize-winner of all Burpee's Varieties — a garlic that 
is equally obnoxious in all society. Grows easily and is hard to squelch. The first 
trial of this garlic is tolerable, the second is intolerable, and all the year round is nau- 
seaus. 

Price — Free — (2c stamp.) 

MOON FLOWER 

Lovliest of all the large flowers, having white mooney faces. These species are 
the result of a long painstaking selection, and are truly magnificent in their clinging 
denseness. Undoubtedly a great acquisition to all those who admire the massive floral 
plant. 

For Sale During Leap Year, $1.00 per Dozen. 

FORGET-ME-NOT 

This charming little favorite succeeds best in the sticks, but will thrive in College. 
Is of unusual hardiness. Will stand either zero weather or torrid heat. Is very green 
with a snowy, glossy, white top. 

Free Sample to all Freshmen. 

BALSAM PAIR 

Burkee's Special Defiance Balsams, lately exported from Ford's Farms, known for 
being rough and knotty and are among the showiest pair seen in this locality. 

For exhibition purposes only, and will not appear after June 26, 1916, as one will be 
transplanted to Arkansas. 









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Burpee's Garden Catalogue 

SMILING DAISIES 
A queer specimen of yellow eyed daisies, admirably adapted for a campus bench 
and Sunday night dates. Start in the fall, carefully tend during the winter, and in 
the spring it blossoms forth leaving a trail of romance. Thrive especially on moonlight 
and river banks. 

$5.00 a Dozen, and Weight from 110-112 3-4 pounds. 10c Pkg. 
CABBAGE LEAVES 
An old time variety, largely used for pickling; the heads are flat and grow 
remarkably large retaining a soft texture and known for their tenderness. They are 
known as the "sweetest cabbage ever seen." 

||i | 3 for 5c. 

"TATERS" 
Special dry weather type, known as "Rural New Yorker No. 2;" Have big eyes 
and are very plump Their skin is creamy white and are mealy when very young. 
Nothing will wilt them. 

70c a peck. 
DRIED PEACHES 
Formally rich, red and rosy; closely akin to the Chinese Cling — or any kind 
of cling. To restore first freshness and flavor, remove all Annex Atmosphere, stir 
well into at least six parties, and provide 220 degrees F. of dates. 






2 1 4 







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Burpee's Garden Catalogue 

PRUNES 
Special S. U. variety, badly wrinkled yet well preserved. Common Annex dish 
— generally served in the evening — most obnoxious boarding house fare. Have a rich 
nuty flavor, that remains even when they leave. Guaranteed to be the pruniest prunes 
on the market. 5c a Pound — 6 Pounds 25c. 

MONKEY FLOWER 
Sawbone, baboon variety just imported from South Africa, only plant alive: 
attracts much attention, good border shrub for side walks. Thrives under frequent 
pruning, has a willowy grace. Wegkly exhibitions _ 10c a ghow-2 Shows Saturday. 

ONIONS 

This onion was introduced in 1884 for those people who consider a mild onion 
insipid. Has done well since its first appearance and especially urged for early spring 
bunching. It should be remembered that the onion is one of the few vegetables that 
all College folks like, and these have especially distinct merits. They have a thin 
skin of an attractive straw color, which is capable of high polish. Are of the long 
necked variety. 

PHI TURNIP GREENS 

Angular in shape, of extra verdant hue, handsome and superior quality, fit for 

either sports or er — er sports! Guaranteed never to lose their freshness; commonest 

on the market. 6 Bundles 5c. 









215 





















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2 1 7 






A Chapel Talk 



What are they doing, the Faculty stern 

As they sit high in the chapel? 

Thinking deep, with eyes that burn, 

Frowning and scowling with great show of skill 

And turning their master minds at will 

At ten-thirty o'clock in the chapel. 



. 



He grabbed a note book, that Faculty man 
From his coat as he sat in the chapel. 
The wings of his brain they kitgan to fan 
And the golden sun a climbing went 
And most straight down its rays were bent, 
And still all sat in the chapel. 

Long in his chair sat the Faculty man, 

The students sat patient in the chapel. 

And figured and thought as a great man can, 

With his competent hand the pages filled, 

And searched the notes of his brain, well tilled, 

To make a fresh talk in chapel. 

He made it long, did the Faculty man 
(How short are the visitor's in chapel) 
Then Philosophized and once more began, 
Gathering his thoughts from off the wing, 
And rounded the poor dry, empty thing 
Into a speech to give in the chapel. 

"This is the way," laughed the Faculty man, 

(Laughed as he sat in the chapel) 

The only way since men began 

To make a talk you folks will heed." 

Then opening his mouth, with the proper speed 

He made his talk in the chapel. 

Dry, dry, dry, O man, 

Dry as the dust in the chapel! 

Disgustingly dry, Faculty man. 

The boys on the left began to moan, 

And the lassies to sigh, and seniors to groan. 

At the Faculty speech in the chapel. 

Yet quite satisfied is this Faculty man, 
At the talk that he made in the chapel, 
Yet from disgust the students ran; 
The fellows groan and moan the day, 
When the Faculty again such speech will say, 
As they talk of all talks in the chapel. 

11'//// apologies to Elizabeth B. Browning. 












218 




Harper's Book of Facts 



An Unclassified Encyclopedia of the Foolishness of South- 
western, Written Without Rhyme or Reason. 



With less than a million references to subjects in the realm of 
Love, Flirtation, Kissology and Vacuums. 



Compiled by ignorant editors, to occupy space and time, 
under the editorship of 

JOCUND PHRASEOLOGY 



Master of Pholly, Doctor of Garrulous Giddiness, Fellow of the 
Royal Society of Gossiping Gad Abouts, etc., etc. 



Nine months of foolish facts compressed 
into one handy volume. 



B. A. LUNY and BROS., Pub. 

Cor. Hang-out and Loaf-around Streets 
COCKLE BURR JONAH 















2 19 

























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220 




Harper's Book of Facts 









LEE E. EDENS, CONTROVERSATiONALlST 

Pro" 3urton asked Mr. Edens to describe Isabel, a character in a certain Spanish 
play. Lee hesitated and then blurted out boldly: "She was much like tue frivolous 
girls of today." The following note was immediately forthcoming from t lie girls' 
side of the room: 

FIRST NOTE 

Mr. Edens: We would like to know just about how many girls of. this age > on 
have been with and where you got all your valuable information. You would uo us a 
great favor as we want to start a reform. We are not of that type. 

Very respectfully, 

THE GIRLS. 

THE REPLY 

To the Girls: I acknowledge that my experience as a Lad it's' man has been very 
trivial. 1 only base my opinion on some 22 years or general observation. I am glad 
you are about to start a great reform. You know man has been trying to reton.* 
woman ever since sister Eve tempted old brother Adam to take the fatal bite out of that 
apple, — and without success. Bat if the hard-headed and weepy women get hold ot this 
matter it is bound to succeed, if it does succeed and man learns that the reform was 
starred in old Southwestern then you may be sure that both you and the instituted i will 
be famous forever. 

Yours for reform, 

LEE E. EDENS. 









Mr. Edens: We could not decipher your epistle very readily — a typewriter would 
be a good investment. 

It is very kind of you to sanction this great reform that we have started among 
these frivolous girls, and we would greatly appreciate your assistance in this under- 
taking. Adam and Eve have nothing to do with the actions 01 frivolous girls of the 
present day. Can't you think of a more modern source? 

Two of your FRIVOLOUS Friends. 

Perhaps you think Lee was outdone. Not a bit of it! He went home, borrowed 
a typewriter and a book on mythology, sat up all night and the next morning uelivered 
the note given below with the proper air of triumph. 

To the Girls: Acting upon your most highly esteemed advice I will endeavor 
to place all further negotiations in a more intelligible form, — and will suggest that 
you ao likewise. 

I thank my God that all my sisters happened to be brothers, and therefore my 
actual persona! experience has been limited. You asked me to be a little more modern. 
Well, was it not the frivolous beauty of the Sirenes that tempted Ulysses? Was it not 
that same feminine fickleness in Cleopatria that caused the downfall of Caesar? And, "by 
the way,'' does not the hit dog always howl?" (not intending, however, to be a tall insin- 
uating.) 

I appreciate to the highest degree your invitation to assist in this great move- 
ment, but, how r ever, I am sorry to say that I am conscientiously compelled to decline 
your kind invitation, as I am desirous of seeing it a reform for the girls, and by tbe 
girls, for, a^ I have before stated that "vile man has made an absolute failure" in at- 
temping such badly needed reforms. 

Thanks for the ^omnllment as to my ability to judge. I believe you are striking 
the right key note after all. 

Very friendly, 

LEE E. EDENS. 



2 2 1 









Harper's Book of Facts 



IF PEOPLE WERE NOT POLITE ENOUGH TO LIE 

"Mrs. Bishop, could we have a little more tor Sunday night lunch? We just 
starve." 

"No, ma'am. I make you expect more, but when you get there you'll find the 
same old soup and crackers." 

"I have always thought, Bernice, that you were rather clever and pretty and at- 
tractive, but as I've been looking at you lor the last forty-five mintes it has slowly dawned 
upon me that you are rather stupid, homely and uninteresting and — how old you appear!" 

Professor Burton: Perhaps you think this chapel talk has been dull this morn- 
ing, but wait for the next one — it will have no edge at all, and you might as well get 
used to this for its the only variety I give. 

Frank Kagsdale: "I am in the habit of saying I adore going to socials, but I 
don't. I abhor it and I step on my toes every time I start across the room, I spill all 
my refreshments, and utterly detest the prattle of girls." 

After coming into class absolutely unprepared and without an excuse for the 
past week's absence, after playing the part of the clam on the five questions asked 
you the teacher should come to you, pat you on the shoulder and say, "You're a fine 
student, you'll get a distinction all right — don't come any oftener than its convenient — " 

What would you do? 

Sam R.: You know, it's strange, Annie Laurie, after we've been shaking hands 
for three hours I always get tired and wish myself away from here. 

RULES FOR ANNEX GIRLS 

All girls having Sunday night dates must be sure and not return before nine- 
thirty. It might crowd the line if this rule is not observed. 

Girls watching for dates from the second floor porch must not lean over too 
far; if is liable to cause dislocation of the neck. 

It is a fundamental rule of etiquette to talk to a gentleman at least three min- 
utes longer if possible. 

There is open house at the University store where young ladies are allowed to 
receive their young gentlemen friends during the week. 

Talking in the library is permissable, provided you have some one to talk to. 

All young ladies desiring to go into the city must be chaperoned by Freshmen. 

After returning from Lyceum numbers Mrs. Day extends a cordial invitation 
to all young men to remain and finish any unfinished conversation. 

Young ladies who are fond of walking may indulge in this excellent exercise 
provided they do not exceed the speed limit. 

Young ladies, please do not sign your names in the office book upon leaving the 
Annex, it is very annoying to know of your whereabouts at all hours of the day. 

Signed MRS. DAY. 



'2 A 2 






The Millenium Will Come: 



When University rules are obeyed. 

When Pinky strays from Hazel's side. 

When " Sleepy V jokes get funny. 

When Prideanx learns to carry on an animated conversation. 

When Prof. Tinsley forgets to "tote" the excuse box into chapel. 

When Prof. Davidson's top-knot stays put. 

When the Sig's piano cannot be heard. 

When the Geology Class knows its lesson. 

When Prof. Moore gets out of the fashion. 



" 'Tis sweet to love, 
But Oh! how bitter! 
To love a girl, 
And then not git'-er. " 



PROFESSOR CORYELL IN GEOMETRY— for example. 
General statement. 
If you love your girl, your girl loves you. 
Given : you love your girl. 
To prove : She loves you. 
Proof 1. "All the world loves a lover". (Shakespeare.") 

2. Your girl is all the world to you. (Self evident.) 

3. Hence your girls equals the world (things equal to the same thing 

are equal to each other). 

4. Hence your girl loves a lover. 

5. You are a lover (given). 

6. Therefore if you love your girl, your girl loves you. 

Q. E. D. (Ex.) 















223 




















•2-2 4 










The Serenade 



A heart-rending and brain-maddening bit of verse by the President and 
General Manager of the Campus Club. 



Once upon a school-night dreary, as we studied, worn and weary, 
So we would not bust and homeward go ; 

As we read the facts deploring, suddenly ther came a roaring, 
As of someone loudly snoring on the campus just below, 
" 'Tis some Mood Hall Gink" we muttered, "Serenading to us so, 
Only this and nothing more." 

Ah, distinctly we remember, we were in a sad dilemma 
And each Annex girl was raving for these "Sad Boids" to sing more, 
Eagerly we wished another — "Sing 'Where is my lost dog, Rover'?" 
Begged we still for just one other, just one more before you go 
For that high-fallutin tenor, whom we fain would call Caruso, 
Call him this forever more. 

But the silken, sad unwelcome restling of Mrs. Day who came' a 'bustling 
Thrilled us — filled us with a terrior that we never felt before ; 
So to still our nervous flutter out went the lights and down the shutters 
And we all sought hasty entrance in behind the closet door — 
Falling one upon another on the dirty unswept floor, 
This we did and nothing more. 

Presently Mrs. Day grew madder, and her voice grew strong and louder, 
"Git", she said, "you long legged scall'wags, and come no more." 
"While I was the office keeping, up to here you've come a 'sneaking." 
And so loudly she protested that they left not unrequested. 
But we girls were left to suffer the Honor Councils' wrath so sore — 
And we we're campused now forever more. 









225 






Aline: "Inez, have you learned the verse we had in German for today?" 

Inez (Who has been given four verses to learn) : "Oh, yes, I have learned all 
except the first three." 

A GENTLE HINT 

Willie Blount: "Here's your chafing dish spoon. Thanks awfully for letting 
me have it." 

Mabel Shands: "Oh, don't mention it." (Swallowing hard.) "Only next time 
you needn't wash it." 

TEACHING VOICE 

The Education lesson was on the active and passive voice. Ellen Hazel was 
given the assignment to discuss at the board: "How would you teach voice in school?" 
She tried to bluff and this was the information that Prof. Nichols obtained from her 
discussion: 

"The subject of voice is one that is very much neglected in this country in spite 
of its great importance. There is no doubt that the modern scientific methods should 
be applied in teaching voice. Many a person has been ruined bv having voice taught 
improperly. Especial emphasis should be placed upon correct standing, breathing and 
pronunciation." 

SPEAKING OF BADGES 
Freshman: "Is that a Red Cross badge you are wearing?" 
Senior: "No, it's a frat recognition pin." 

"TO LET, LARGE AND AIRY." 
Can anyone explain why Ruth Goddard gets slack in her studies? 

Tennessee (To a Ranchman): "How was the cotton crop this year?" 

EDDY HUMOR 
A freight train was passing. Prof. Eddy had an acute case of Forditis in his 
right forearm, but in spite of this and the noise of the train he was trying to talk 
to his class. At last he gave it up and seating himself in a chair he said: "Well! I 
guess it's no use for a one arm man to try to run over a freight train anyhow." 

OUR SPEAKING PROFESSOR 
It was an informal party given just before the opening of school last fall. Every- 
body was doing some sort of a stunt. Mary Davidson remarked to Prof. Wentz that he 
could not stand up in the center of the room, swing his arms around his head three 
times, each time repeating the prase, "What am I doin?" without smiling. Of course 
Prof. Wentz undertook the matter. Why, hasn't he been studying elocution in Philadel- 
phia for many years? He stood, walked to the center of the room and said with great 
dignity and composure, "What am I doing," three times. Just as he finished Mary 
Davidson remarked "Making a fool of yourself." 

THE TRAGEDY OF THE FARM 
Scene I Act 1 
The farmer felt Good(e). His Gardner had brought Berrys from the Marsh, and 
had caught Black Bass at the Hole by the Mill(s). 

The old Gray Hooks the Straw in Peace for he knew there was Moore Hay for the 
next Day. 

In the yard the Drakes are Hooten fit to Dye, the Lamb lies Weeks on the Moss 
by the Glynn dreaming of fierce Lyons. 

Scene 2, Act 1 
Now the farmer feels his Armstrong, when the Cook Burns the Bass and the Ayer(s) 
smells of Slack Coffee, the farmer raises Cain and tells the Cook real Blount to Trott 
or he would Baker. But the Bishop came which Means Peace and made the farmer 
Walk-er. 

Moral: Never Trott a woman when you can Walker. 

Prof. Moore: "What is a parasite?" 

Miss McAfee: "Do you mean those people of Paris?" 

A jolly laugh is a great benefit to the home, but somehow, or other it is not 
as stable as the horse laugh. 






226 






Useless Verses— Disjointed and Unconnected 






Who'll report 'em, who'll report 'em, 
I'll not for see, There's a fellow to talk to 
me. 

The faculty they held a court, 

And a very stern court held they, 

They sent for the boys, they sent for the 

girls 
On this sad and trying day. 
Each boy he'd cut some good lessons 
And some very good lessons had cut he 
"Oh ho! oh ho!" cried the fellows 
There's some so sly, as can get by 
The faculty in court, whoop'ee. 

There was a young lass 

Who went to S. U. 

She had so many lovers 

She didn't know what to do. 

She flirted with all, without heart and 

unkind, 
And went home and married 
The man left behind. 

There was a Freshman boy 
Who joined the Freshman class 
And went to a Freshman party 
With a pretty Freshman lass 
He went the Freshman gaits 
So he'll be a Freshman still 
The next year or so. 

Oh Honor Council 

Come get your pen 

Here's a poor victim 

You can turn in. 

Where's the little girl to report these two 

She's talking also if you just knew. 

I wish I was a rock 
A sittin' on a hill 
A doin' nothin' all day long 
But just a sittin' still 
I wouldn't eat, I wouldn't sleep 
I wouldn't even wash 
I'd just sit there a thousand years 
And rest myself — by gosh! (Ex.) 

Sing a song of picnics 

Many a lad and lass 
Sam Hay he'd loaned his company 

To Annie Laurie Bass. 



When they reached San Gabriel 

After many a search and glance 

Was not it queer that Tuck was found 
And by his side was Vance? 

James was in his automobile 
Dixie held the eats 
Trav and Crook brought up the rear 
What rare unusual treats! 



Then "Pinkie" soon came on 
Hazel without miss 
Two by two they strolled along 
In rapture and in bliss. 

Oh, when I was a Freshman, 
A Freshman, a Freshman, 

Oh, when I was a Freshman, 

I giggled— did I. 

I giggled and giggled, 

I giggled and giggled, 

Oh, when I was a Freshman, 
I giggled — did I. 

Oh when I was a Sophomore, 

A Sophomore, a Sophomore, 

Oh when I was a Sophomore, 

I grinned — did I, 

I grinned and grinned, 

I grinned and grinned, 

Oh when I was a Sophomore, 

I grinned — did I. 

Oh when I was a Junior, 

A Junior, a Junior, 

Oh when I was a Junior, 

I smiled — did I, 

I smiled and smiled, 

I smiled and smiled, 

Oh when I was a Junior, 

I smiled — did I. 

Oh when I was a Senior, 
A Senior, a Senior, 
Oh when I was a Senior, 
I scowled — did I. 
I scowled and scowled, 
I scowled and scowled, 
Oh when I was a Senior, 
I scowled — did I. 












227 






Prof. Nichols was explaining that so many men lose out in business because they 
are victims ot' "Get-Rich-Quick schemes." He was urging deliberation in making big 
deals. "A man should go slow in matters of this sort" he said. All were listening 
attentively when Gladys Brewer said impatiently: "But, Dr. Nichols, most men are 
too slow already." 

Prof. Moore could not read a written exercise by one of our most silver-tongued 
orators — Mr. Chisholm. 

"Shall I read it for you, Professor?" 

"No," replied Prof. Moore, "next time simply write a little note at the bottom 
of the page and tell me what it is all about." 

It was a cold day and they were having trouble in keeping the Annex warm. It 
was noticed at dinner that Professors Granberry, Moore, Eddy and Manchester had 
been invited to dine with the inhabitants of the Chilly Annex. Dr. Bishop presided 
over this august body. It was rather strange to some people but there was no further 
difficulty in keeping the Annex warm that night. The warm air system of heating worked 
perfectly. 

Prof. Gray: "What is the principle fact that is not disputed in regard to the 
authorship of Mark?" 

Sinks McLarty: "Why, that Mark ran around with Peter!" 

In Bib. Lit. Sinks disagreed with a statement in the text book. 
Prof. Gray: "Why didn't you raise that question with the author, Mr. McLarty?" 
Sinks: "Well, you see, I don't know the author." 

Prof. Gray: "That is what I thought. You are not familiar with him, in other 
words." 



SMILE JUST SMILE 









Prof. Eddy (In German 51): "Herr Seale, you may begin the translation for 

today." 

Mr. Seale: "Er — ah — er — er. I can't think of the meaning of that first word." 
Prof. Eddy: "Well, you may stop right there, and Mr. Edens, you may take up 

the translation where Mr. Seale left off." 

Prof. Moore (In Freshman History): "Mr. Merritt, what was the cause for 
the decline of Feudalism." 

Goat Merritt: "The cause for the decline of feudalism was the introduction of 
Fire Alarms." 

Few people are so conscientious as our own well-beloved William Nevil; the 
man with the extraordinary wind and nerve, brass and bombast: in writing "Poetry" 
and in cross country running. He believes in avoiding even the appearance of evil. 
It was as he was returning from the Annex after the Martha Washington party that 
this conversation occurred: 

Barcus: "Didn't you think that the marching in the Grand March was the 
same as dancing, Nevil?" 

Nevil: "Yes, but you see I was careful not to keep step with my girl so it was 
all right." 









228 




Margaret: "Do you like best sellers?" 

Inez: "I don't know who Best (Bess) Sellers is." 

April 16, 1916. The 220 yard dash. Contestants: Happy Hull, Archie Hoyl and 
Texas Special. Winner: Texas Special. 

Student: "Prof. Tinsley, how can you tell the difference between a plant and 
an animal?" 

Prof. Tinsley: "That is perfectly clear. Suppose you were casually walking 
along and saw a tree grazing in the field with a cow under it. You could at once see 
the difference between a plant and an animal." 

A group of girls were looking, at a picture of the Colisuem which hangs in the 
reception hall at the Annex. Said Lucy Lee: "What is that a picture of?" 

Elizabeth Smyrl responded immediately: "Why, that is a picture of the old An- 
nex. It burned down more than twenty years ago." 

They say that Lucy will stand before the picture and gaze at it by the hour. 
She has often been heard to wonder why they built that ill-fated Annex round. 



Dr. Nichols was delivering himself of certain views of his on the subject of 
marriage. "No man should marry until he has saved up enough money to support a 
family," he said. This was followed by a depressing silence, finally Gladys Tinsley re- 
marked, "But, Dr. Nichols, it takes some men so long to save up any money." 

Some people state that this year's Freshman bunch is far above any we have 
ever had before. We doubt this statement. For instance 1916 bunch of Emeralds have 
not produced an instance that would compare in verdance with the renowned and never- 
to-be-forgotten Alfred Mumme. Tt is stated on good authority that the first time he 
walked to town in the metropolis of Georgetown he remarked to someone: "These 
pavements are sure hard on a fellow's feet." 

Prof. Tinsley's Geology classes are always large and he often adopts the method 
of calling on the pupils alphabetically. Of course it is a simple matter to count up and 
find out just about when your turn will come. But Prof. Tinsley will not do this any 
more, we fear. A thick-skulled Freshman spoiled it all answering the roll by shouting 
out "Number 17" instead of present. 

STARTLING FACTS 
Everett Martin had a date for the Freshman party. 
The freshman class has a fancy "Seale." 
Briggs is still a Freshman. 

After three months of training Mood Hall boys persist in mashing peas with 
their fork to eat with their knives. 



der" 



A PROPOSITION 
Would it be "Wright" if Tinsley had "Moore" "Nichols" for Granberry to "Wun- 

What If? 

What if Coryell were to get animated? 

What if "Posse" Simmons had a date? 

What if there were no "Hard Nine"? What would "Sawbones" do? 

What if Mood Hall ran out of "grits"? 

What if Johnny Harris were not a Freshman? 

What if Coach Rix wore a hat? 

IF YOU CAN'T SMILE, GRIN 















229 







Skins of pretty girls remind lis 
We can make our skins sublime, 
If we use cosmetic lotions 
Day and night and all the time. 



"A beautiful maid did smile at me," 

Said the Freshman in his childlike glee, 

Said a soph mature, 

"Why certainly — sure, 

When / saw you first I laughed at thee! 



We regret that for the lack of space we can not print the entire poem by Wm. 
Nevil on "Reverie," but can publish these two lines for the inspiration of posterity: 

"My mind is wrapt in silent awe, 
Thinking of the things I've saw." 



A PSALM 

The honor council is my shadow, I shall not be lonesome. It followeth me up 
halls and down halls; it leadeth me away from temptation (boys); it alloweth me three 
minutes; it leadeth me in the strait and narrow path for my own "safety first" yea 
though I converse more than three minutes in the halls I shall not be alone, for it is 
always behind me; it's time piece and stern countenance watch o'er me. It maketh 
dates with me in the parlors, it sitteth in judgment upon me, its accusations are many. 
Surely call downs and campuses shall haunt me all the days of my life and I shall 
remember the Honor Council forever. 






How are you feeling? 

"Rotten," said the apple. 

"Punk," said the firecracker. 

"Good," said the preacher. 

"Fine," said the police judge. 

"Swell," said the toothache. 

"Elegant," said the dude. 

"Fit," said the tailor. 

"Well," said the Artesian driller. 

"First rate," said the post-master. 

"Tip-top," said the Prep belfry. 

"Grate," said the anthrcite coal. 

"Bully," said the Mood Hall steak. 

"Tough," said the ditto chicken. 

"With my fingers," said the fresh Freshie. 



IF YOU CAN'T GRIN- 



230 









Book Reviews 



THE LEARNING PROCESS 

Colvin 

Appreciated by Sam F. Drake, the well known Psychologist — Fresh man. 

I wish to say that I have thoroughly studied and analized this volume. I would 
like to state that it represents my own view on the Psychology of Learning and the 
original nature of man. I thoroughly agree from my own experience in College that 
nothing but the most thorough scholarship should be tolerated. It strangely happened 
that on one occasion I found a course in which I did not study and found the effects 
very disastrous. Therefore my moral to all Freshmen is, "Be sure and study. -- 



DOING SOCIETY 

W. B. McMillan 

I wish to say that this book comes as a result of years of experience and I can 
vouch for the truth of any statement therein. It will be found valuable to any young 
man who desires to make himself popular. A brief glance at the contents will show 
its real worth. 

introduction — My own experiences. 

Chapter 1. — The more young lady friends the better. 

Chapter 2. — A wide assortment is easier to manage. 

Chapter 3. — It's comparatively simple to find from fourteen to twenty-eight 
dates a week. 

Chapter 4. — A sunrise breakfast gives you a chance for one date. 
Chapter 5. — Kodaking parties fill the afternoon. 
Chapter 6. — Any young lady is glad to ride for an hour at sunset. 
Chapter 7. — It's a simple matter to get dates for the evening. 
Chapter 8. — Thus four dates a day is easy. 
Chapter 9. — Four times seven are twenty-eight. 
Chapter 10. — Two dates a week will cinch any girl. 
Chapter 11. — Fourteen girls is a good list to start on. 
Chapter 12. — Girls may be dropped or added at will. 

Appendix 1. — Baseball games, tennis, invitations to dinner, a little spin to a 
neighboring town, will add at least twenty dates a month. 

Appendix 2. — This makes a grand total of one hundred thirty-two dates a week. 
Appendix 3. — A sum total of one thousand, five hundred, eighty-four a year. 



GO LOOK IN THE MIRROR AT 
YOURSELF AND LAUGH 
























231 









COUPLES 







Tbrn^vHamj. 



'•Ins 8 -Tennessee, 



•2 3-2 






"THE MAN OF THE HOUR" 
Copyrighted by Dawson, Gorsline, Jacques, Cowan and McDaniel. 

Chapter 1. — A man must wear a "Pomp" if he is to be popular — by four hours 
work daily a good one can be developed. DAWSON. 

Chapter II. — The greatest insight into the character of the human species of the 

male variety is the quality of shirt worn. It's an easily proven geometrical proposition 

that the strength of a person varies exactly as the loudness of the shirt increases. I 

do not wis"h to boast, but I have been called the "strongest man in North Texas." 

GORSLINE. 

■ 
Chapter III. — A man's feet are usually the biggest thing about him so he should 

note with particular care the latest thing in socks. "Screaming" ones can be secured 

anywhere 2 for 25c. Or, if you prefer, you may follow my own plan and buy them by the 

dozen from Sears, Roebuck & Co. COWAN. 

Chapter IV. — A bizarre appearance is often useful, at least it makes an impres- 
sion and a man can do anything when he is the center of attraction. A barber pole 
suit is a cheap accessory for rare occasions. JACQUES. 

Chapter V. — Many a man after following all the beauty hints given above still 
fails because he neglects one of the most vital things. It is the complexion. There 
are several good massage creams on the market, but I have a variety invented by my- 
self which accounts in a large way for my remarkable lily-like complexion. I will 
send the prescription free if 25c is sent for postage and packing. McDANIEL. 

"FRECKLES 
By Red Knickerbocker and Red Chapman. 
"Those million little freckles on his charming little nose, 
Add to his looks of dignity and repose." 

"THE MAN HIGHER UP" 
Percy Black 
"He was the tallest Texan of them all." 

"THE MELTING POT" 
Gymnasium 
"And when the summer day was hottest they all together danced." 

"CAN SUCH THINGS BE" 
Freshman Martin 
"They wondered much and still the wonder grew, 
That Martin's head could hold all he knew." 

"ELSIE'S NEW RELATIONS" 
These Cousins (?) Good cousins, bad cousins, fat cousins, lean cousins, 
But all Annex cousins are boy cousins. 

BED VERSUS RIDING 
A new and clever book just off the press. It compares the number of deaths 
resulting from two great menaces to human life — Riding Horseback and Going to Bed. 
Instructive, Startling, but Reassuring. It bring out the unreasonableness of FEAR. 

TRAVIS COTTRELL. 
A GREAT BARGAIN 
I have just completed a big volume on Fishing. I wrote this volume during the 
English 151 Examination and can state that it represents actual experience. Special 
price to students $5.00. 

DEAN PEGUES. 
FOR TRADE OR EXCHANGE 
A motley collection of love letters, candy boxes, pressed flowers and men's hearts. 
See me immediately; am desperate. RUTH BLANKS. 

JUST DISCOVERED 
The color of "Red" Knickerbocker's hair — it is burnt orange. 

Question: Is Warren Hull ? ? ? No, just plain nut. 









233 







234 





reparatory 
Depl. 







The Preparatory Building 

This building- was the first structure erected by Southwestern Univer- 
sity. For a long time it was only two stories, a third being added later. 
During the past few years it has been greatly modernized as a school building 
and has been very much beautified. 









235 
















W. B. McMillan, A. B. 

Principal of the Fitting School 

W. B. McMillan is a graduate of Southwestern. After his graduation 
he was principal of Georgetown High School which position he resigned to 
become Professor of History and director of Athletics in the Waco High 
School. He was elected to the position he now holds in 1912. He has not 
only increased the efficiency and attendance of the Fitting School, but his 
continued efforts have changed the "Prep" from a barren and desolate look- 
ing place into an attractive and inviting school. The results of his labor are 
seen both in the building and on the grounds; — the improvements on the latter 
being a matter of civic pride to the whole town. Mr. McMillan is one of the 
most successful principals the Pitting School has had. 



286 








Student Instructors 

E. L. Albersou German 

Nellie Carr Latin 

iTravis Cottrell English 

Mary Davidson English 

Inez Dunlap English and Histoiy 












237 










Student Instructors 

Lawcile El rod Latin 

Cornelia Gayden Latin 

Stanley Haver History 

J. L. Lyons History 

Marion Mallard French 



288 




Student Instructors 

Eugene Perrin Mathematics 

H. G. Simpson. Mathematics 

W. A. Smith, Jr History 

Vera Smith English 

Elizabeth Smyrl Spanish 



239 



















Travis Literary Society 



ROLL OF MEMBERS 



Allan, W. D. 
Anglin, W. F. 
Carter, Stanley 
Cronse, H. M. 
Dickehute, H. H. 
Hu.teh.ins, E. 
Long, A. L. 
Matlock, L. R. 



McConn, E, D. 
Raymer, H. 
Smith, L. W. 
Shnptrine, G. E. 
Van Pelt, D. 
Vaught, J. C. 
Weiser, H. D. 
Wilhite, C. S. 



Wilkie, W. J. 



240 

















Travis Commencement Debate 



Question : Resolved, That the United States should adopt a system 
of Compulsory Arbitration of all Strikes, Constitutionality waived. 



AFFIRMATIVE 

H. H. Dickehute 
A. L. Long 



NEGATIVE 

Stanley Carter 
C. S. Wilhite 



Orator W. J. Wilkie 



TRAVIS PRESIDENTS FOR 1915-1916 









A. L. Long, 



H. II. Dickehute, 



C. S. Wilhite 






24 1 







Fitting School Foot Ball Team' 

TOP ROW — Left to right: Dunnam, Young, Munson, Bailey. 
SECOND ROW — Hartso, Dickehute, Wilhite, Swickheimer, Tucker. 
BOTTOM ROW— Ilfrey, King. 










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Fitting School Basket Ball Team 

TOP ROW — Fowler, Manager, Tucker, Wilhite, Ilfrey, Smith, Coach. 
BOTTOM ROW— Carter, Munson, Captain, Martin, Irwin. 



2 4 '2 





Fitting School Students 



Abbott, Lawrence 
Adams, Margarett 
Allen, Dillard 
Anglin, R. F. 
Baker, L. W. 
Bailey, D. B. 
Bird, Burgin 
Bishop, Rose Doddie 
Boone, Fletcher 
Bowen, Lily 
Brady, F. T. 
Bnrris, B. W. 
Carlisle, T. L. 
Cartel', Stanley 
Castelow, Coryne 
Catoii, Leonard 
Clark, Velva 
Crouse, Howard 
David, Kathleen 
Davis, Silas 
Dickehnte, II. H. 
Dnnnam, S. M. 
Eddy, Helen 
Eddy, Laura 
Ellis, Mary 
Erickson, C. W. 
Fowler, J. B. 



Griffin, T. P. Jr. 
Hall, W. C. 
Hamilton, H. H. 
Harrell, Pressley 
Hartzo, S. A 
Henderson, S. II. 
Hensley, Wendall 
Hewitt, M. S. Jr. 
Hutchins, G. E. 
Ilfrey, I. C. 
Irvine, Thomas 
Irwin, Lyddell 
Jackson, Lncile 
Joiner, Darwin 
King, F. II. 
Levy, Aida 
Long, A. L. 
McConn, E. D. 
McGhee, Chester 
Masters, Leta 
May, E. 
Munson, J. W. 
Munson, P. E. 
Munson, P. W. 
Newberry, Allan 
Onderdonk, Mary Eliza- 
beth 



Parker, H. C. 
Parr, Weezie 
Punchard, Lois 
Punchard, Louise 
Raymer, Hardy 
Reed, C..B. 
Reeve, T. R, 
Roberts, R. S. 
Sells, Mildred 
Shuptrine, G. E. 
Smith, L. W. 
Sneed, J. P. 
Stone, P. G. 
Swickheimer, Lee 
Tucker, Dixie 
Tucker, L. G. 
Vaught, John 
Weisser, H. D. 
Weeks, Marvin 
Whittenbere:, Pharis 
Wilhite, C. S. 
Wilkie, W. J. 
Wilson, Irma 
Wilson, Leah 
Wright, Bell 
Young, W. P. 



243 













Acknowledgements 



It is hard to say good-bye to the one object that has been 
the center of existence to you for a whole year. But the last 
batch of copy is ready to go forward to the printer and this 
little acknowledement must go with it. The work has been 
very pleasant this year ; we have felt the loyalty of the Student 
Body and we have been so fortunate as to have as co-workers 
people who were willing to give themselves unreservedly to 
the work. There were a few on the staff who have not been 
able to devote much time or energy to the Sou 'Wester, but 
these were the exception rather than the rule and they were 
more than compensated for by the loyalty and enthusiasm of 
the others. 

There is no need to speak here of the art work done by 
Messrs. Frank Ragsdale and W. W. Crook. It speaks for it- 
self. However, they have made practically every design, 
mounted every picture and helped in the general editorial 
make-up of the book. The amount of work done by them has 
been extraordinary and we wish the credit for this work to 
go just where it belongs. 

To Mr. Darsey and Mr. Gilchrist we feel indebted for their 
cheerful service. 

This year a Freshman Staff was organized as a new 
venture in editing the Sou 'Wester. The following members 
of this staff have rendered efficient service : Misses Edna 



Sullivan, Lillian Jennings, Margaret McKennon, Oatman, 
Guyer, Dot Howard, Lucile Hardin, Eila Bass; Messrs. Paul 
Baker, Burdette Sparks, Faust Collier, Everette Martin. 

We are deeply indebted to Dr. Cody and Mr. Dee Simp- 
son for their kind assistance in the preparation of the Tradi- 
tion Department. 

Through-out the year Dean Pegues and Prof. Moore have 
shown their keen interest in the success of the publication and 
have helped in numberless ways. They have, stood ready to 
help us at all times. 

If the humorous department has anything of snap and 
life about it no small part of the credit for this should go to 
Misses Vera Smith and Travis Cottrell who so generously vol- 
untered to help. 

We disclaim all responsibilitv for the Senior "Squibs". 
Hattie Stanford, "She done 'urn". 

We wish to thank the advertisers who have made the fin- 
ancial success of the book possible. 

Huah S. Carter 
A. Ward Wilson 






244 




dvertisements 



We cater to Discriminating 

College Men and Women 

When you buy wearing apparel you are pretty apt to have 
your own individual idea about it. You'll never find abetter place 
to make your selection than at this store, Everything you buy 
will be satisfactory or your money will be refunded cheerfully. 
Quality, correct styles and prices that are right certainly bring us a 
great business. 

Stromberg- Hoffman Co. 

' ' The Progressive Store' ' 

TRADE IN GEORGETOWN 



We <0%Cai\e Home Life Happier 
Mason &c Hamlin, Bush & Gerts and Hardman 



PIANOS 



Player Pianos, Victor Victrolas, Sheet Music, Band Instruments 

of all kinds. 

/. R. REED MUSIC COMPANY 

AUSTIN 



T. B. STONE 

Vhe DRUGGIST 

Endeavors at all times to fill your wants for anything in his line. Eastman 

Kodaks, Boston Safety Fountain Pens, Imperial Crown Perfumes. 

A fine line of Toilet Requisites. 

ALWAYS QLAT) TO SEE YOU. 



'2Ab 



THE TO GG ERY 




Mw&(\ Gents' Furnishers 




fi'rJ /' il\ \ Best Line of 

^dnP TIES > SH0ES > SHIR TS 




|Hs . <. 7 on d Everything that Dressing Men Need 




i Iffa I ^ ^' f >r ' ce Line Handled 




fill "The College Man's Store 




THE TO GG ERY 




/. W. LONG 




Made a bid for the Student trade upon establishing in Georgetown years 




ago. He has received a liberal portion. There are reasons: 




You never call for an article and receive the reply, "We 




haven't got it." He is striving for a larger portion 




DRUGS 




Athletic Goods, School Supplies, Drinks 




and everything a first class Drug Store should have. 




THE REXALL 





246 



DIAMONDS 



WILCOX BROS. COMPANY 

Jewelers and Stationers 



WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING 
OUR SPECIALTY 




Hnmlet - Ala.sf poor Von~l miov Him well. 



247 



STILES DRUG COMPANY 

THE NYAL STORE 

New Cream Parlor 

New Line of Eastman Kodak Films and Supplies. Imported Perfumes, 
Toilet Water, Etc. Free Delivery. 

ONLY THE BEST 



For College Girls 

Everything in Ready-to- Wear and Novelty Footery 

For College Boys 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Manhattan Shirts 
and Walk-Over Shoes 

Georgetown [ j~l £^ l* f\ J /\ Qeorgetown 



The Palace Barber Shop 

The College Man's Place 
BALLERSTEDT & CRONE, Proprietors 

The Favorite for Years 



248 



You can not buy a Cadillac Car at the Price of a Ford 
Neither can you buy 



BELLE OF WICHITA FLOUR 

At the Thrice of Lower Qrade Flour. 

IT IS UNCONDITIONALLY GUARANTEED 

Wichita Mill and Flour Company 

WICHITA FALLS, TEXAS 

"Buy-it-Made-in-Texas" 



KODAK FINISHING 

Mail Orders given ^Prompt Jlttention. Work, Guaranteed. 

The Jordan Company 

We make Kodak Prints Every T^ay 
610 CONGRESS AVE. AUSTIN, TEXAS 

thirty-nine Years 

of service to subscribers, and constructive uplifting work in its chosen field 

has made the 

Williamson County Sun 

the most potent factor in the trade today. Its thousands of readers are 

greatly influenced and safely guided, not only by its reading 

pages, but by its advertising section as well. 



PATRONIZE our ADVERTISERS 



24 9 



I'll Bet You Hadn't Thought 
of it in Just this Way 

nAD IT EVER OCCURRED TO YOU that you had as well 
try to he a successful physician without attending a medical 
school, oi' a successful lawyer without attending a law 
school, or a successful minister without attending a theological 
school, as to try to be a successful hanker or merchant or business 
man of any kind without first getting a practical business training? 
If you wanted to make a first class doctor, lawyer or minister, you 
would attend a university with a reputation. Why not use the same 
good judgment in selecting a business school in which to secure 
your training? The Tyler Commercial College of Tyler, Texas, is 
the business university of the South; it enrolls more students an- 
nually for Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Stenotypewriting, Cotton Class- 
ing, Business Administration and Finance, and Telegraphy than 
any other similar school in America. Its students have come from 
39 different states; its graduates are holding the \evy best of posi- 
tions in the leading cities of the United States. 

If yon will spend from $100.00 to $150.00 for tuition, board and 
hooks for a course of Shorthand and Stenotypewritino- or Book- 
keeping or Telegraphy, or Cotton Classing or Business Administra- 
tion and Finance, or better still, spend $175.00, to $200.00 and com- 
plete any two of these courses, you will have made the best invest- 
ment of your life. What young man or woman with grit and de- 
termination cannot raise this amount ;? Hundreds of students who 
borrowed every cent of their money to attend our school or gave 
ns their note on tuition have found it the best venture of their lives; 
they were soon able to pay back the borrowed money, continue hold- 
ing their good job, or go into business for themselves, with assur- 
ance of success. I f you always remain where you are, you will al- 
ways be what you are. 

TYLER COMMERCIAL COLL EGE^j- ^TYLE R, TEXAS, . 

TELEGRAPHY ' '' -^LARGEST IN AMERICA 




2 50 



Students and Friends of S. U. 

Spend your leisure moments looking over our select stock of 

Books, Stationery and Musical Instruments 

together with attachments for same Best makes of Razors and Pocket Knives, 

Tooth and Hair Brushes, Combs — in fact nearly everything a student needs. 

Our Artists' Material stock is always kept full of the best makes. Have 

over 300 styles of Picture Moulding and have had sixteen years 

of experience making Picture Frames. Come often and stay 

a long time. We assure you a hearty welcome awaits you. 

Richardson s Boofy Store 



Established 1892. 



Mail Orders a Specialty. 



c. & s. 

(CASWELL & SMITH) 

Sporting Goods Company 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 

jlthletic Outfitters for Schools and Colleges 



Qeorgetown Commercial 

Most up-to-date Newspaper 
in Williamson County 

Job 'Printing Given 'Prompt Attention 

Students' Trade Appreciated 

LEE J. ROUNTREE, Prop. 



The.... 

ALCOVE 

E. M. CHREITZBERQ 



25 1 




SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 



SOUTHWESTERN UNIVESITY, the great, old College of Texas 
Methodism, enters upon its forty-third year with the opening of 
the session of 1916-17. The years have brought a rich heritage 
of traditions, an untold wealth in the hundreds of Alumni and 
thousands of ex-students. The courses of study are vigorous, the 
student life democratic and expenses moderate. 
^ Southwestern University has a strong faculty, splendid build- 
ings and equipment, and a new Science building, concrete, rein- 
forced with steel, now being built, will be ready for you next Sep- 
tember. All this, located in a beautiful, picturesque old College 
town, surrounded by wholesome influences, makes Southwestern the ideal 
place for college work. 

^ Are you thinking of entering college? Then send for a booklet descrip- 
tive of Georgetown and the college life at Southwestern. It is yours for the 
asking. Address 

Tfegistrar, Southwestern University 

Georgetown, Texas 




252 



FIRST RATIONAL BANK 



Georgetown, ^exas 



Capital Stock, $100,000. 



Surplus and Profits, $50,000 



We Solicit Your Banking Business 



OFFICERS: 



J. E. COOPER, President. C. S. BELFORD, Vice-President. I. N. KELLER, Cashier. 

W. O. WOODLEY, Jr, and EUGENE H. EANES, Ass't Cashiers. 



LONE STAR FISH and OYSTER CO. 

C. W. GIBSON, Proprietor 
CORPUS CHRISTI, SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS, (508 West Commerce Street) 



Noted for shipping perfectly Fresh Fish 

and the largest shippers of bay Fish on Texas 

coast. Gibson has studied for ten years the Oyster's 

habits and has discovered the secret of maintaining the 

delightful sea flavor of the Oyster from the water to the table. 



San Antonio i sP roudofthe 

Fl /^ 77 _ record its gradu- 

emale Lottege ates have s made 

in SOUTHWESTERN, Freshman and Sopho- 
more college years taught at S. A. F, C. 



/. E. HARRISON, President 

San Antonio, Texas 

Route 8, Box 26 



PETMECK|Y'S 

AUSTIN 



Victrolas 

Quns and 

General SPORTING Goods 



253 



DR. S. S. MARTIN 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 
Office at Postoffice Drug Store 



Office 78. 



— Phones — 



Residence 401 



DR. S. H. McCARTY 

DENTIST 

Over Stiles Drug Store 

Residence 92 —Phones— Office 387 

GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 



DR. G. E. HENSCHEN 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 

Office at Stiles Drug Store 
Office 3I6-2R. —Phones— Residence 3 I6-3R 



DR. G. K. TALLEY 

EYE, EAR. NOSE AND THROAT 

Glasses Fitted 
Office South side Square, over Price Brothers 



DR. W. H. MOSES 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 
Office Stone's Drug Store 



Residence 390 



-Phc 



Office 333 



DR. W. J. BURCHAM 

DENTIST 

Office No. 227 -Phones- Residence 255 

Georgetown, ^Uexas 



DR. THOMAS 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 

Office Stiles Drug Store 
Office No. 10 — Phones- Residence 96 



MOOD HALL STORE 
^he ^Place of Qood £ats 

TOM R1DGWAY, Prop, 



A BUSINESS EDUCATION 

TOBY S S 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 

CHARTERED, $50,000.00 CAPITAL 

Waco, Texas 

Bookkeeping. Banking 
Short hand. Typewriting, 

Penmanship and 

Academic Departments 

The High Grade School 

lor High Grade Students 

Catalog Free-Eflter Any Time 

WE TEACH B Y MAIL 

Bookkeeping, Short- 
hand, Touch Typewrit- 
ing, Penmanship, Busi- 

__ ness Arithmetic, Simpli- 

pQD YOU llod English, Commer- 

^^ ^^ c i e 1 1 Law and Business 

■ Letter Writing. 




Southwestern University Summer Normal 

and Summer Sessions of Academic and Theological Teaching begin on 

June 1 9th 

Spend your Summer at Southwestern. 



2 5 4 




Hit 



p id! « ' fi|11 Rl. ! 



Sill 



j ,I !!{finlJ | " ,Bl?J, »l»Hir 

"'lll*' 1 !^ ""Hill 

iBiiiiillliB B 'E'"??.!""' inii.f.1 




QUNTER HOTEL 

EUROPEAN 



PERCY TYRRELL, Manager 



San Antonio, Texas 



ESTABLISHED 1874. 



CAPITAL STOCK $75,000 



Von Boecfymann- Jones Company 

PRINTERS, 
ELECTROTYPERS AND BOOK BINDERS 

County Bonds, City Bonds, School Bonds, Stock Certificates, 

Corporation Seals, Rubber Stamps, Blank ^Bool^s, 

Corporation Tfecord BooJ^s 



81 1 Congress Ave. 



Austin, Texas 



255 



THE TtRISKILL 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 



Headquarters for 

Southwestern Students 
When in Austin 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



In the heart of the theatrical 
and Shopping District 



THE BEXAR 

ALFRED SANNER, Prop. 
Cor. E. Houston and Jefferson Streets 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



Strictly Modern 
in all its Appointments 

French, German, Spanish and Italian spoken 



E. A. WRIGHT 
ENGRAVING CO 

Engravers, 
'Printers, Stationers 



GRIFFITH 

LUMBER COMP'NY 



FREDERICK R. HYNSON 



Factory, Offices and Salesrooms 

BROAD AND HUNTINGDON STS. 

Central Store 

1218 WALNUT STREET 



Philadelphia 



BUILDING 
MATERIAL 

OF ALL KINDS 



Contractors and Builders 



Georgetown, Texas 



256 



SCARBROUGH'S 

The Shop for Smart Dressers — Men and Women 

For every day and all occasions 
you will find that this store knows 
what you want— AND HAS IT 

Everything that Students Wear — Always Quality 

E. M. SCARBROUGH & SONS 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 


Field-Lippman jesse french 

r> . r» . PIANO 

riano o tores company 

HIGH CLASS 

Pianos, Players, Victrolas 
and Records 

J. C. Phelps, Southwestern Manager, 1021 Elm St. 

DALLAS 


Mines on the M. K. & T„ Bastrop County. 

Postoffice address, McDade, Texas, R.F.D. No. 2 

Long Distance Phone. Glenham via Elgin. 

BASTROP LIGNITE 
COAL CO. 

Miners and Shippers of 

HIQH GRADE LIGNITE \ 

F. L. Denison, Pres. and Mgr. F. W. Denison, Vice.Pres. 
C. A. Hughes, Secy-Treas. 


Mail Orders Solicited 
on High Class, High Qrade, Reliable 

READY-TO-WEAR 

For Men, Women and Boys 

Washer Bros. Co. 

SAN ANTONIO 


THE MODEL 

BAKERY 

For fresh Bread, Cakes, Pies and all 
good things to eat that a good baker 
knows how to make. Let us make 
the bread and cakes for your parties 



•2 5 7 



WALTER BOX 




Inventor of the Famous 

SILENT BOX GASOLINE MOTOR 



Automobiles 
Motorcycles 
Auto's for Hire 
Livery service 



Complete Line of Furniture 
Art squares 
Victor Machines 
and Victrolas 



Latest Victor Records 



The Greatest 

Establishment 

of its fana 1 

in Williamson County 



The Walter Box Co 



Georgetown, Texas 




^58 




259 



We have a very Complete Stock of 

Books, 
Pictures, Stationery, 

Place Cards, Tally Cards and 
Pennants 

Leather Qoods, Magazines 
and many other things 

PUBLISHING HOUSE 

M. E. Church, South 

SMITH & LAMAR, Agents 
1 308 Commerce St. Dallas, Texas 


Drey fuss & Son 

Gents' 
Furnishers 


CLASSIEST 

SHIRTS, TIES, SHOES 
AND CLOTHING 

"The College Man's Store" 
Dallas, Texas 


Mecca Cafe 

Best Short Order House 

in Dallas 


W. H. DAVIS 

Furniture Comp'y 


Wholesale and Retail 

FURNITURE 

Mattings, Linoleums 

Window Shades 

Wall Paper 

Georgetown, Texas 


Westbrook Hotel 

Southwestern Headquarters in 

Fort Worth 

H. B. CHRISTIAN, "President 



Mill 



R. J. STONE 



PHO TOS 

of QUALITY 



If the Pictures in the Sou'wester remind you of 
the days you used to be a Southwestern 
student and your picture was in the 
Sou'wester, I still have your old neg- 
atives, and can make you pictures 
of yourself like you used to be. 




261 



The Best Kodak Finishing 

at most reasonable prices b\) 

Vernon Stone 

— at — 

Wilcox Studio 



J. W. DABBS 

A utomobile Service 

Teams to Rent, Sanitary Dairy 
Hauling 

Vhe litest of all these Services 



R. T. COOPER 



W. R. McELROY 



Cooper & McElroy 

"Real Estate 
and Loans 

Farm Mortgages and City Property Bought and Sold 
GEORGETOWN, VEX AS 



Twentieth Century 

Barber Shop 

The College Man 's Barbers 

COLEMAN & MILES, Props, 



Mood Hall 

TailoringCompany 

Where 

the Boys 

have their worJ^ done 



Johnnie always looks so neat. 

Or course he and other particular dressers send their Laundry 

THE ACME WAY 

Launderes T)ry Cleaners 

FORT WORTH, TEXAS 



2 62 



NEW ORIENTAL HOTEL 

DALLAS, TEXAS 
AMERICAN PLAN EUROPEAN PLAN 

Official Headquarters 

Students When in Dallas feel at home at the Oriental. 
It is a Mecca for College Football and Baseball players. 
Special attention is extended lady students. Banquets 
and dinners arranged on short notice. The Oriental is 

Your Headquarters 



Turkish Baths 
Day and Night 



OTTO HEROLD, Manager 



^he Best Service is via the Katy 




The Katy limited 






The Texas/ feraaa/ 



TheKatv FTvcip 



263 



The Farmers State Bank 

Georgetown, Texas 

Capital and Surplus - - $110,000 

1§ You are cordially invited 
to make this Bank your Bank, 
assured that your account will be 
appreciated. Our banking equip- 
ment is complete in all departments and 
and we shall be glad to attend to any of 
your wants in our line. ^ Come in and see 
us. You are welcome at all times, whether 
you are a customer or not. 



OFFICERS: 
E. G GILLETT, Pres. J. A. BOOTY, Vice-Prcs. 



W. L. PRICE, Cashier 



$unshine § pecja[ 

t(C Uhe Attractive Way" 

To Summer Resorts 



Round trip Tickets on sale Daily 
until September 30th. 

Long limits; Liberal stopovers 

^C/ie Fastest Train Schedule ever 

maintained; Texas to St. Louis, 

Memphis and beyond. 




Convenient Passenger 
Service between Princi- 
pal Texas Cities. 

Superb 
Dining Car Service 



STANDARD SLEEPERS 
on all Night Trains 



Jo PEECE 

GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET AGENT 
Houston, Texas 



264 



Spend Your Vacation at 

THE NUECES 



NUECES HOTEL 

MODERN FIRE PROOF EUROPEAN 

230 ROOMS 230 BATHS 

120 ROOMS WITH PRIVATE BATH 
110 " " DETACHED BATH 

Rates $1.00 PS> D£ 

SPECIAL RATES BY THE WEEK OR MONTH 

Unexcelled Cafe Service. Moderate Prices. 
HUNTING SEA BATHING FISHING 

THE BEST ALL - YEAR - ROUND 
CLIMATE IN THE WORLD 



JOE J. NIX, Mgr. ^ 



Write for special Rates 



•A65 



Jl Practical Education 




XS ONE that can be turned into dollars and cents. Is yours that 
kind ? CJ There is no limit to the height to which you may rise in 
the business world if you prepare yourself for it. No profession 
no trade offers the opportunities for ultimate wealth and position that does 
the business world. Can you afford to let your chance slip by? CflThe San 
Antonio Business University, the school with the university touch, prepares 
young people for the best positions — not the $5 or $10 per week job, but 
$25 and $30 per week positions. We are a university of business education. 

WRITE FOR PRICES AND COURSES 



San Antonio Business University 




The School of Quality 



307 Jlamo Plaza 



San Antonio, Texas 



266 




ENGRAVINGS IN THIS ANNUAL BY 

SOUTHWESTERN ENGRAVING COMPANY 

FORT WORTH. TEXAS 



Abandonment 



Just a sittin and a fisliin 

( )n a summer day, 
A sittin and a dream in 

About the far away. 

Not a workin and a sweatin 
( hi an Annual page 

Not a workin and a t'rettin 
Like I'se in a cage 

Not a workin and a worryin 
A bringin on old age. 

Just a restin and a sinj>in— 

'Cause the Animal's done 

A restin and a feel in 

Like a. rich man 's son 

A restin on my honors 

And havin lots of inn. 

Its a sellin and a takin 

I .like other dandy books 

A sellin and a goin 

But so have my good looks 

A sellin and I'm happy 

A danglin mv fish hooks. 



Finis 



2 7 1 




THE END 



272 



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